Sunday, November 30, 2014

2.2.2.6. Thomas Torrance (1897-1953)

Thomas Torrance was born on 9 May 1897 at 55 Calder Street in Dixon's Rows, Blantyre, to Andrew and Margaret (Hamilton) Torrance. When the 1901 census was enumerated the Torrance family was living in Kirkton, High Blantyre, but by 1911 the family was back in Dixon's Row and lived at 43 Calder Street. Thomas was 14 years old, but not yet working.

On 6 January 1927 He married Henrietta Cassels (Brodie) Thomson, the widow of Nathaniel Thomson. She was nearly five years Thomas' senior. They married were married at the Salvation Army Hall by Ensign James Clark of the Salvation Army. By that time Thomas was 30 years old and working as a miner.

He and Henrietta had two children Thomas Torrance in 1929 and Henrietta Cassels Brodie Torrance in 1933.

Thomas died on 4 April 1953 of chronic bronchitis, emphysema and cardiac failure at Hairmyers Hospital in East Kilbride. At the time of his death he was still working in the coal mines. He and his wife, Henrietta, lived at 82 Logan Street, Blantyre. He is buried in High Blantyre Cemetery.

82 Logan Street, Blantyre; photograph courtesy of Google Maps
_______________
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Torrance, Thomas (Census 1901 624/00 003/01 021)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 3; Page: 21; Line: 23; Roll: CSSCT1901_245
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Torrance, Thomas (Census 1911 624/00 007/00 031)
82 Logan Street, Blantyre, Google Maps
Scotland Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1897 Torrance, Thomas (Statutory Births 624/00 0208)
Scotland Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1927 Torrance, Thomas - Brodie, Henrietta Casse (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0005)
Scotland Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1953 Torrance, Thomas (Statutory Deaths 643/00 0109)
UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current, Thomas Torrance

Black Lung Disease

Dr. Archibald Makeller wrote a paper in 1846 about Black Phthisis, or Black Lung Disease.

"Among the many diseases incident to the coal miner, none come oftener under medical treatment, than affections of the respiratory and circulating organs. While the collier is subject -- during his short but laborious life -- to the other diseases which afflict the laboring classes in this country, such as inflammations, fevers, acute rheumatism, and the various eruptive diseases, he, at last, unavoidably, falls victim to lesions within the cavity of the chest, arising from the nature of his employment. In the present communication, it is proposed to lay before the profession a series of remarks, which I have been enabled to put together, with a view to elucidate the cause and progress of that very peculiar pulmonary disease, incident to coal miners, which I shall denominate Black Phthisis.

The rise and progress of the malady may be thus sketched: A robust young man, engaged as a miner, after being for a short time so occupied, becomes affected with cough, inky expectoration, rapidly decreasing pulse, and general exhaustion. In the course of a few years, he sinks under the disease; and, on examination of the chest after death, the lungs are found excavated, and several of the cavities filled with a solid or fluid carbonaceous matter."

Coal miners; photograph courtesy of Kentucky Coal
Mining History

Coal mining was a dirty occupation. The dust got in miners' clothes and in their lungs. Before Black Lung Disease was well understood, causes of death would include almost any description of respiratory or circulatory illnesses. Most common were broncho-pneumonia, pulmonary phthisis, and later emphysema.

Saturday, November 29, 2014

2.2.2.6. Nathaniel Thomson (1886-1919)

Nathaniel Thomson was born on 2 June 1886 at 30 Bairds Rows, Blantyre, to Thomas and Mary (Wright) Thomson. His mother registered his birth at the parish office by making her mark.

Bairds Rows were constructed in 1878 two years after Craighead Pit opened. The Rows were named Craighead Rows but locally were called Bairds Rows. They were built in three rows and the streets were not named, but each housing unit was numbered.

Aerial view of Bairds Rows; photograph courtesy of Britain from Above

When the 1891 census was enumerated the Thomson family was living at the same address. Ten years later the family was living at 17 Netherfield Place, Blantyre. Nathaniel was 14 years old and already working in the coal mines as a hewer with his father. Curiously, he was listed as Alexander Thomson on the census form. His mother died at the Combination Poorhouse in Hamilton in 1903.

In 1911 Nathaniel's father, Thomas, was a patient at the Lanark District Asylum, more familiarly known as the Hartwell Asylum. His infirmity was listed as imbecile. Nathaniel was boarding at the home of William and Mary Campbell at 37 Stonefield Road and working in the mines.

He married Henrietta Cassels Brodie on 11 October 1913 in Glasgow. He said both his parents were deceased. However, I have not found a death registration for his father during the relevant time period. In 1915 Nathaniel and Henrietta were renting a house on Springwell Place for 6 pounds a year.

Nathaniel died on 1 April 1919 of chronic bronchitis from which he had suffered for two years. He died at his home on 34 Dixon Street with his wife, Henrietta, present.

_______________
"Aerial View of Bairds Rows," Britain from Above
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Thomson, Nathaniel (Census 1891 624/00 007/00 012) 
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 7; Page: 12; Line: 17; Roll: CSSCT1891_223
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Thomson, Thomas (Census 1901 624/00 005/02 010)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5A; Page: 10; Line: 19; Roll: CSSCT1901_246
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Thomson, Nathaniel (Census 1911 624/00 007/00 001)
1915 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1915 Thomson, Nathaniel (Valuation Rolls VR107 / 305 / 599)
Scotland Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1886 Thomson, Nathaniel (Statutory Births 624/00/0228)
Scotland Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1914 Thomson, Nathaniel - Brodie, Henrietta Casse (Statutory Marriages 644/10 1853)
Scotland Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1919 Thomason, Nathaniel (Statutory Deaths 624/00 0099)

Friday, November 28, 2014

Dixon's Rows: "A Most Miserable Type of House"

William and Henrietta (Cassels) Brodie and many of their descendants lived in Dixon's Rows. It was a housing complex at first rented by and then owned by William Dixon, Ltd. The Dixon company owned several coal mines in Blantyre, Lanarkshire, Scotland. Many of my Scottish ancestors were coal miners, worked for the Dixon company, and lived at Dixon's Rows.

In 1910 Dr. John T. Wison wrote "The Housing Condition of Miner's," a report by the Medical Officer of Health. The Scottish Mining Website extracted a description of Dixon's Rows from the report:
  • Erected about 33 years ago -- one story, brick -- no damp-proof course -- walls not strapped and lathed, plastered on brick, a few wood floors, unventilated; majority brick floors -- some walls slightly damp -- internal surface of walls and ceilings good.
  • No overcrowding -- apartments large
  • No garden ground available, wash houses with water, no coal cellars
  • Water closets recently introduced, in the proportion of one closet to every 4 tenants
  • No sinks -- drainage by open channels
  • Water supply from stand pipes in street, the well being at a distance varying from about 12 to 200 feet from the houses
  • Scavenged at owners' expense, but houses are not included in Blantyre Special Scavenging District

Dixon's Rows, Stonefield, Blantyre, Lanarkshire, Scotland;
Image courtesy of Auld Blantyre Mining

In 1914 evidence was presented to the Royal Commission which described Dixon's Rows:

"These rows cover a very extensive area, and are situated in the centre of the Blantyre district. They were erected some forty years ago, and are owned by William Dixon, Ltd. They consist of 157 single- and 149 double-apartment houses. The rent per week is 1s. 11d. for a single-apartment, and 3s. 2d. for two-apartment house. They are a most miserable type of house, thrown together with bricks in the cheapest possible fashion, with floors consisting largely of flags laid down on the earth. They are in a district well supplied with water, but are only served by means of standpipes at long intervals along the row. They have recently been included in a special scavenging district, which as greatly improved the sanitation of the place. There are no sculleries or sinks, consequently all the dirty water has to be emptied into an open gutter that runs along the front of each row. There is a wash house for every 4 and 8 double- and single-apartment tenants, respectively. There is a water-closet outside for every 3 and 5 double- and single-apartment houses, respectively. Dust-bins are in vogue, with a daily collection of refuse. There are no coal-cellars. There is a man employed locally for cleaning up the place."


By the 1930s the housing units in Dixon's Rows were so old and dilapidated, they were demolished.

Thomas and Henrietta Cassels (Brodie) Torrance Headsone

The memorial monument for Thomas and Henrietta Cassels (Brodie) Torrance is located in High Blantyre Cemetery, Blantyre, Scotland. Find A Grave member Elizabeth Grieve very thoughtfully fulfilled my request for a photograph within hours of my request.

Memorial memorial for Thomas and Henrietta Cassels (Brodie) Torrance; photograph
courtesy of Find A Grave member Elizabeth Grieve

In
Memory of
Thomas Torrance
Beloved husband of
Henrietta Brodie
Who died 4th April 1955
Also the above
Henrietta Brodie
Who died 18th Nov. 1965
Aged 73 years

2.2.2.6. Henrietta Cassels Brodie (1892-1965)

Henrietta Cassels Brodie was the youngest child of William and Henrietta (Cassels) Brodie. She was born on 17 July 1892 at 9 Calder Street in Dixon's Rows, Blantyre. She lost her mother to tuberculosis in December 1893 and likely had no memories of her. William, her father, married Mary Campbell 1894.

In 1901 William's family was living at 15 Dixon Street, still within the Rows, in a two-room attached house. His second wife had three children of her own by that time. With three children from his first marriage still living at home, I imagine the home was a crowded place.

When Henrietta was 15 the family lived at 3 Dixon Street and she had finished her schooling and was working in a cloth factory. She married Nathaniel Thomson two years later on 11 October 1913. They married in Glasgow by declaration in the presence of two witnesses. Both lived in Blantyre at the time of their marriage. Nathaniel was a coal miner.

The couple made their home on Springwell Place, which was off Glasgow Road, and in 1915 paid 6 pounds annually in rent. Theirs was a brief marriage, however. Nathaniel died on 1 April 1919 of chronic bronchitis, which he suffered from for two years. He died at home at 34 Dixon Street, Dixon's Rows, Blantyre.

Almost fourteen months after Nathaniel's death, Henrietta gave birth to Agnes Brodie Thomson on 29 May 1920 at 3 Dixon Street, which was the home of her father. No father was listed on Agnes' birth registration and her name was recorded as Agnes Brodie or Thomson. Henrietta had gone back to work at the cloth factory after her husband's death.  About four years later, she gave birth to a second daughter, Mary Thomson.

On 6 January 1927 Henrietta Cassels (Brodie) Thomson married Thomas Torrance in the Salvation Army Hall in Blantyre. She was 34 years old and no longer working. Thomas was a coal miner and lived with his parents at 169 Stonefield Road at the time of their marriage.

Thomas and Henrietta had two children. Thomas born on 17 December 1929 and Henrietta Cassels Brodie Torrance born on 26 January 1933.

Thomas Torrance died in 1953 of chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and cardiac failure. He died at Hairmyres Hospital and was buried in High Blantyre Cemetery. Henrietta lived another 12 years and died on 18 November 1965 of stomach cancer. She, too, is buried in High Blantyre Cemetery.

_______________
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Brodie, William (Census 1901 624/00 005/01 037)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page: 38; Line: 1; Roll: CSSCT1901_246
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Brodie, William (Census 1911 624/00 007/00 018)
"High Blantyre Cemetery," Find A Grave
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1892 Brodie, Henrietta Cassels (Statutory Births 624/00 0311)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1914 Thomson, Nathaniel - Brodie, Henrietta Casse (Statutory Marriages 644/10 1853)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1927 Torrance, Thomas - Brodie, Henrietta Casse (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0005)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, Extract of an entry from the Register of Deaths in Scotland, 6473853 CE
UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current, Torrance, Henrietta

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Allan Line Steamship Company, Ltd.

The Allan Shipping line was started in 1819 by Capt. Alexander Allan and traded between Scotland and Montreal. By the 1830s the company had offices in Glasgow, Liverpool, and Montreal. Capt. Allan's son, Sir Hugh Allan, had taken over the business by 1854. He was able to take control of the Royal Mail contract between Britain and America from Cunard. By the 1880s, the Allan Line was the largest privately owned shipping concern in the world.

S/S Lake Erie in the Clyde river; courtesy of the Clyde-built Ships Database

In 1897 the company became the Allan Line Steamship Company, Ltd., of Glasgow and opened offices in Boston and London. In 1918 the company was purchased by Canadian Pacific Steamships and by 1919 the Allan name had disappeared from the ocean waves.

Early 1900s postcard of the S/S Grampian; image courtesy of Gjenvick-
Gjonvik Archives

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

2.2.2.4.3.1. Gordon Vernon Wilson (1929-1994)

Gordon Vernon Wilson was born in Okotoks, Alberta, Canada, to Collan Grey and Mary Brodie (Moore) Wilson. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen on 2 August 1956 and lived at 365 West Merrill in Rialto, California.

In about 1948 he married Betty Lou Behm. She was born on 16 February 1929 in San Bernardino county, California, and was a daughter of William and Florence (Mederos) Behm. Her father worked as a furnace man at an iron foundry. The had an unknown number of children.

Sometime before 1961 Gordon and Betty Lou Behm divorced. She went on to marry three more times. Gordon married Florence Athena Hillberg, who was born on 15 December 1915 in Alabama about 1961. Florence Athena was the daughter of Oscar and Eula (Maygarden) Hillberg. She had been married previously. In 1993 Gordon and Florence lived in Gold Hill, Oregon. He died the next year in Jackson County, Oregon. Florence died on 2 November 2007 in Talladega, Alabama. They are buried together in Hillcrest Memorial Park, in Medford, Oregon.

_______________
US, Border Crossings, Canada to U.S., 1895-1956, 1938 Wilson, Gordon Vernon
US, Federal, Certificate of Citizenship, Application No. 230-50-110 651 142
US, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, 1994 Wilson, Gordon Vernon
US, Oregon Death Index, 1898-2008, 1994, Wilson Gordon
US, Nevada Marriage Index, 1956-2005, Hawkins, Ernest William - Wilson, Betty Lou
US, Public Records, 1993 Wilson, Gordon Vernon
US, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Name: Florence Athena Hillberg; Issue State: Texas; Issue Date: Before 1951
US, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Number: 565-34-4803
US, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Number: 568-32-9155
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, 568-32-9155, California
Global, BillionGraves.com Burial Index, 1994 Wilson, Gordon Vernon

2.2.2.4.3. Mary Brodie Moore (1905-1986)

Mary Brodie Moore was the third child of James and Martha (Brodie) Moore. She was born on 23 December 1905 at 14 Calder Street, Dixon's Rows, Blantyre. She was six years old when she, her siblings, and mother left Scotland to meet their father in Canada.

Mary married Collan Grey Wilson, who was born on 8 August 1892 in Colorado, and together they four children though I only know about a son named Gordon Vernon Wilson in 1929. Collan died on 22 December 1972 in San Bernardino, California. Nothing is known about his parents.

Mary applied for a Social Security account in 1944. At that time she lived in Rialto, California, and indicated her name was Mary Irene Wilson, her parents were James Moore and Martha Lillian Brodie and that she had been born on 23 December 1907 in Blantyre, Scotland. I believe she fudged a bit about her age on the application form.

She died on 14 April 1986 in Riverside County, California.

_______________
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Moore, Hannah (Census 1911 624/00 003/00 046)
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Series: RG 76-C; Roll: T-4791
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1905 Moore, Mary Brodie (Statutory Births 624/00 0025)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Mary Moore, 1912
US, Application for Social Security Account Number, 550-36-2548
US, California, Death Index, 1940-1997, Date: 1972-12-22
US, California, Death Index, 1940-1997, Date: 1986-04-14
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Number 573-26-2453; Issue State: California; Issue Date: Before 1951
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Number 550-36-2548; Issue State: California; Issue Date: Before 1951

Children of Henrietta (Moore) Scott

Henrietta Moore and her first husband, Harry Scott, had three children:

2.2.2.4.1.1. Margaret Lillian Scott (1920-2011)

The lives of Margaret Lillian Scott, and her husband, Robert Milton Hendrickson, will be covered in future posts.

2.2.2.4.1.2 William Scott (unknown-unknown)

Nothing is known about William Scott. His name was given to my by a the husband of Margaret Lillian (Scott) Hendrickson's daughter.

2.2.2.4.1.2. Hazel Scott (unknown-unknown)

Nothing is known about Hazel Scott. Her name was given to my by a the husband of Margaret Lillian (Scott) Hendrickson's daughter.

2.2.2.4.1. Henrietta Moore (1901-unknown)

Henrietta Moore was born on 1 December 1901 in Blantyre, Scotland to James Moore and Martha Brodie. She was their eldest child. The family lived at 54 Dixon Street in Dixon's Rows, housing for miners.

Her father immigrated to Canada in February 1911. When the census was enumerated later that same year, Henrietta, her mother and siblings lived at 8 School Lane in High Blantyre and Henrietta was attending school.

On 8 August 1912 Henrietta, her mother and three younger siblings boarded the Allan Line's S/S Grampian in Glasgow, Scotland. They arrived in Quebec, Canada on 7 September 1912 and their destination was Cranbrook, Ontario, Canada, where they were to join Henrietta's father.

While in Canada, Henrietta's youngest brother, Robert, was born in 1914. Four siblings -- John, Mary, Hannah, and little Robert -- lived in a home for neglected children in Calgary, Canada in 1916; but Henrietta has not been located in that special census of Canada's western provinces.

She married Harry Scott, by 1920, as their eldest daughter was born in December. Again, I have not been able to locate this family in the 1921 census. Harry and Henrietta had two other children, according to a granddaughter's husband -- William Scott and Hazel Scott.

Harry's parents was born on 17 July 1892 in Windsor, Canada. His parents were David Scott and Margaret (Halls) King. Harry died on 30 December 1969 in Peace River, Alberta, Canada, so he and Henrietta must have divorced some time before 1947.

When Henrietta's eldest daughter crossed the border in 1944, she listed her mother as her nearest relative. Henrietta lived at 1627 12th Avenue W in Calgary and her surname was Scott. When her daughter crossed the border again in 1947, Henrietta lived at the same address but her surname was Krenelka. So she married her second husband sometime between 1944 and 1947. Nothing is known about him.

The 1953, 1957 and 1958 Canada Voters' Lists included a Henrietta Krenelka living at 2333 Hillside Avenue in Calgary. None of those voters' lists included a husband at the same address. The 1953 list noted Henrietta was a widdow.

She married Edgar "Ted" Kingston sometime before 1963 as she wass listed on the 1963 and 1965 voters' lists living at 9031 33rd Avenue in Calgary with Edgar Kingston, who was retired. I believe he died in 1969. The 1972 and 1974 voters' lists stated that Henrietta lived at the same address. No husband was listed. The 1974 list indicated she was a widow.

Another family tree has a death date of 1974, but I have found no evidence for her death at this time.

_______________
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Moore, Henrietta (Cenesus 1911 624/00 003/00 046)
Canada, Passenter Lists, 1865-1935, 1912 Henrietta Brodie
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980 1957 Calgary, Alberta, Henrietta Krenelka
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980 1958 Calgary, Alberta, Henrietta Krenelka
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980 1957 Calgary, Alberta, Henrietta Krenelka
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980 1963 Calgary, Alberta, Henrietta Kingston
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980 1965 Calgary, Alberta, Henrietta Kingston
Canada, Voters Lists, 1335-1980 1972 Calgary, Alberta, Henrietta Kingston
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980 1974 Calgary, Alberta, Henrietta Kingston
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-1915, 1901 Moore, Henrietta (Statutory Births 624/00 0597)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, 1912 Henrietta Brodie

Children of Martha (Brodie) Moore Martin and her Husbands

2.2.2.4.1. Henrietta Moore (1901-unknown)

The lives of Henrietta Moore and her husbands will be covered in a future post.

2.2.2.4.2. John Moore (1903-unknown)

John Moore was the second child of James and Martha (Brodie) Moore. He was born at 16 Calder Street in Dixon's Rows, Blantyre. He was eight years old when he, his siblings, and mother left Scotland to meet their father in Canada. In 1916 he lived in a home for neglected children in Harvetta Heights, Calgary, with three other siblings. In 1921 he lived with his mother and her second husband, Louis Verral Martin, at 22 Centre Street in Calgary, Canada.

2.2.2.4.3. Mary Brodie Moore (1905-unknown)

The lives of Mary Brodie Moore and her husband, Collan Grey Wilson, will be covered in future posts.

2.2.2.4.4. James Moore (1908-1910)

James Moore was the fourth child of James and Martha (Brodie) Moore. He was born on 20 June 1908 at 8 School Lane in High Blantyre. He died six days before his second birthday of acute broncho-pneumonia from which he had suffered for three days previous to his death. His aunt Elizabeth Muir (Brodie) Lively died on the same day in the same home.

2.2.2.4.5. Hannah Moore (1910-unknown)

Hannah Moore was the fifth child of James and Martha (Brodie) Moore. She was born on 17 November 1910 at 8 School Lane, High Blantyre. She was not quite two years old when she, her siblings and mother left Scotland to join their father in Canada. In 1916 she lived in a home for neglected children in Harvetta Heights, Calgary, with three other siblings.

2.2.2.4.5. Robert Moore (1914-unknown)

Robert Moore was sixth and youngest child of James Moore and Martha (Brodie) Moore. He was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. In 1916 he lived in a home for neglected children in Harvetta Heights, Calgary, with his three older siblings.

2.2.2.4.7. Jean Martin (1917- )

Jean Martin was born about 1917 in Alberta, Canada, to Louis Verral and Martha Lillian "Lily" (Brodie) Moore Martin. When the 1921 Canada census was enumerated she lived with her parents and half-brother, John Moore, at 22 Centre Street in Calgary. Jean was the informant on the registration of her father's death in 1958. At that time she was married to a man named McIntosh and lived at 1544 Williams Street in Vancouver.

_______________
1921 Canada Census, Reference Number: RG 31; Folder Number: 3; Census Place: Calgary, Calgary East, Alberta; Page Number: 22
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Moore, Hannah (Census 1911 624/00 003/00 046)
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Series: RG 76-C; Roll: T-4791
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1901 Moore, Henrietta (Statutory Births 624/00 0597)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1903 Moore, John (Statutory Births 624/00 0526)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1908 Moore, James (Statutory Births 624/00 0391)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1910 Moore, Hannah (Statutory Births 624/00 0630)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1910 Moore, James (Statutory Deaths 624/00 0134)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Hannah Moore, 1912
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Henrietta Moore, 1912
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, John Moore, 1912

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

2.2.2.4. Louis Verral Martin (1889-1958)

Louis Verral Martin was born about 1888 in Ontario or Alberta, Canada, to Louis Henry and Elizabeth (Robinson) Martin. When the 1891 census was enumerated, Louis' father was a carpenter and the family continued to live in Calgary. In 1906 the family still lived in Calgary. No information about occupations was included on the census form, but the family did keep three horses, 12 milk cows, and six other types of cattle.

By 1911 Louis' father had died and he lived at home with his widowed mother and sister in Calgary. Louis worked as a house painter and apparently kept quite busy, working 54 hours per week. In 1910 he earned $600. Five years later, Louis was 27 years old, continued to live with his widowed mother at 10th Street, Northwest in Calgary. His mother worked as a maternity nurse and Louis' occupation was unknown.

Between the time the 1916 and 1921 censuses were enumerated, Louis Verral Martin married Martha (Brodie) Moore. She had emigrated from Scotland in 1912 with her four living children. Her first husband had come to Canada in 1911. About 1917 Louis and Martha had a daughter they named Jean.

When the 1921 census was enumerated, the family lived at 22 Centre Street in Calgary, which they rented for $40 per month. Louis worked as a driver for a motor livery and had not been out of work the previous year. His earnings were reported to be $1,200. In addition to the family, Louis' step-son, John Moore, and his younger sister, Florence, lived with them as well as two boarders.

Some time around 1925 the family moved to Vancouver and Louis retired in 1953.

He died on 13 June 1958 at Vancouver General Hospital of acute coronary thrombosis and ventricular fibrillation. Contributing factors to his death were arterio-sclerosis and an old myocardial infarction. His address before his death was 555 South Renfrew. He was interred on 17 Jun 1958 at Ocean View Burial Park in Burnaby, Canada.

_______________
1891 Canada Census, Census Place: Calgary, Alberta, Territories; Roll: T-6425; Family No: 186
1906 Canada Census, Census Place: 9, Calgary, Alberta; Page: 10; Family No: 2
1911 Canada Census, Census Place: Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Page: 6; Family No: 67
1916 Canada Census, Census Place: Alberta, Calgary East, 05I; Roll: T-21948; Page: 34; Family No: 419
1921 Canada Census, Reference Number: RG 31; Folder Number: 3; Census Place: City of Calgary, Calgary East, Alberta; Page Number: 22
Canada, British Columbia, Death Index, 1872-1990, 1958 Martin, Louis Verral
Canada, British Columbia, Registration of Death, No. 58-09-006897

2.2.2.4. James Moore (1871-unknown)

James Moore was born on 18 December 1871 at 71 Greenmount, Belfast, Ireland, to John and Elizabeth (McFarlane) Moore. He was baptized on 4 January 1872 according to the customs of the Church of Ireland, an Anglican denomination, at St. Anne's Church in Shankill.

Baptismal font from the old church at Shankill. James
Moore was likely baptized at this font. A new Church
of Ireland Cathedral also called St. Annes' was built
in 1899; photograph courtesy of Library Ireland

By 1891 his family had moved to 17 Calder Street in Dixon's Rows, Blantyre, and was working as a coal miner. On 9 July 1897 James married Christina Rinn, a 21-year-old, who was working as a servant. They married according to the forms of the Free Church of Scotland. His wife died of cardiac valve disease on 7 July 1899. They had no known children.

James and Martha Brodie were married on 28 March 1901 at Martha's family's home according to the forms of the Church of Scotland. Over the next decade they had five children. Their youngest son, named for his father, died on 14 June 1910. Their last address in Dixon's Rows was 16 Calder Street, which the family rented from William Dixon, Ltd., for 3 pounds, 18 shillings. Rent was due annually on Whitsun. The family had moved out of Dixon's Rows between 1905 and 1908 to 8 School Lane, High Blantyre.

James and his younger brother, John, boarded the Allan Line's S/S Lake Erie on 18 February 1911. They traveled third class and arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 2 March 1911. James told Canadian officials he intended to become a permanent resident of the country, had been a coal miner for 25 years, and had $148.00 with him. No destination was listed on the passenger record.

After James Moore arrived in Canada, I could find no additional documentation about his life.

_______________
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Moore, James (Census 1891 624/00 034)
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page: 34; Line: 24; Roll: CSSCT1891_223
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Moore, Martha (Census 1901 624/005/01 044)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page: 44; Line: 10; Roll: CSSCT1901_246
1905 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1905 Moore, James (Valuation Rolls VR107 / 224 / 340)
"Baptismal font from old church at Shankill," Library Ireland
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Series: RG 76-C; Roll: T-4738
Ireland, Baptismal/Birth Records for Ireland, Irish Family History Foundation, 18 December 1871, James Moore, County Antrim
Ireland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1620-1911
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1897 Moore, James - Rinn, Christina (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0066)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1901 Moore, James - Brodie, Martha (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0039)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, James Moore, 1911

Monday, November 24, 2014

2.2.2.4. Martha Brodie (1881-1957)

Martha Brodie was the fourth child of William and Henrietta (Cassels) Brodie. She was born on 8 September 1881 at 20 Park Street in Dixon's Rows, Blantyre. In 1891 the family had moved to 9 Calder Street within Dixon's Rows. Martha's mother died in 1893 and her father remarried the next year.

On 29 March 1901 Martha Brodie married James Moore, a 29-year-old widower, who worked in the coal mines and also lived in Dixon's Rows. Martha worked as a domestic servant at the time of her marriage.  Two days later the 1901 census was enumerated and the newly married couple lived at 16 Park Street. Between 1901 and 1910 James and Martha had five children.

In 1910 they lost their fourth child, James Moore. He was two years old at the time of his death and died of acute broncho pneumonia. Martha's older sister, Elizabeth Muir (Brodie) Lively died in Martha's house the same day of tuberculosis.

James immigrated to Canada on 18 February 1911. Martha remained in Scotland with their children; and when the census was taken on 2 April of that year, she was living at 8 School Lane in High Blantyre.

1910 British Ordnance Survey of School Lane in High Blantyre; image
courtesy of ScotlandsPlaces

On 31 August 1912 Martha and her four living children -- Henrietta, John, Mary Brodie, and Hannah boarded the Allan Line's S/S Grampian in Glasgow. They arrived in Quebec City, Canada on 12 September. Their destination was Cranbrook in Huron County, Ontario to meet Martha's husband, James.

By 1921 Martha had added Lillian as her middle name and was going by Lily. She had also married Louis Verral Martin, a driver for a motor livery. When the 1921 Canada census was enumerated Louis and Martha lived at 22 Centre Street in East Calgary. The couple considered themselves Methodists. Martha's son, John Moore, was living with them although he was listed as a roomer on the census form. The couple had a daughter named Jean, who was born about 1917 in Alberta.

Martha Lillian (Brodie) Moore Martin died on 28 July 1957 at her home on 1822 Franklin Street in Vancouver of recurrent cerebral hemorrhages from which she had suffered for two months. Contributing factors in her death were long-term cerebral arterio-scelerosis, and hypertension. She was interred on 30 July 1957 at Ocean View Burial Park in Burnaby, Canada.

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"1910 British Ordnance Survey of School Lane," ScotlandsPeople
1921 Canada Census, Reference Number: RG 31; Folder Number: 3; Census Place: Calgary, Calgary East, Alberta; Page Number: 22
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891, Brodie, William (Census 1891 624/00 005/00 0033)
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page: 34; Line: 2; Roll: CSSCT1891_223
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Moore, Martha B (Census 1901 624/00 005/01 044)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page: 44; Line: 11; Roll: CSSCT1901_246
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Moore, Hannah (Census 1911 624/00 003/00 046)
Canada, British Columbia, Certificate of Death, Registration No. 1957-59-008269, No. 26033985
Canada, British Columbia, Registration of Death, No. 57-09-008269
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Series: RG 76-C; Roll: T-4791
Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950, Martha Brodie
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1881 Brodie, Martha (Statutory Births 624/00 0312)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1901 Moore, James - Brodie, Martha (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0039)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Martha Moore, 1912

Sunday, November 23, 2014

2.2.2.2.1.1. Eva McPhail McKillop (1932-1982)

Eva McPhail McKillop was born in 1932 in the Govan area of Glasgow to John and Eleanor (Potter) McKillop. She was given her mother's birth name, which was Eva Hood McPhail.

She married Benjamin James Thompson in 1960 in the Partick area of Glasgow.

Sometime after their marriage and before 1977 Benjamin and Eva immigrated to Corio, Victoria, Australia. They appeared in the Australian election rolls in 1977 and 1980. In 1977 they lived at 12 Clavus Road and Benjamin was employed as a technician. Their home was located in the electoral subdivision of Sutherland. They lived at the same address in 1980. Corio is a working class suburb of Geelong.

12 Clavus Road, Corio, Victoria, Australia; photograph courtesy of
Google Maps

Eva died in 1982 in Corio, Victoria, Australia.

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Australia, Death Index, 1787-1985, Thompson, Eva McPhail, 1982
Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980, Eva McPhail Thompson, 1977
Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980, Eva McPhail Thompson, 1980
Scotland, Statutory Birth Registration Index, 1855-2013, 1932 McKillop, Eva McPhail, 644/21 544
Scotland, Statutory Marriage Registration Index, 1855-2013, 1960 Thompson, Benjamin James - McKillop, Eva McPhail, 644/08 0256

Saturday, November 22, 2014

2.2.2.2.1. Eleanor Potter (1898-1967)

Eleanor Potter's birth name was Eva Hood McPhail. She was born 26 February 1898 at the Govan Combination Poorhouse, which had been built at Merryflats about 25 years earlier. Her mother was Christina McPhail, a domestic servant who lived in the Pollockshields area of Glasgow. She was a single woman and Eva's father was not listed on her birth registration. I do not know how long mother and baby remained at the poorhouse.

By 1901 Eleanor had been adopted and was living with her new mother, Annie (Millar) Potter, and several of Annie's natural children at 16 Blantyre Street in the Anderston area of Glasgow. Annie was listed as a widow but I can find no record of her husband, Robert's, death. They were married in 1876. Eleanor was listed as Helena McPhail, adopted daughter, on the census form. Ten years later, she was still living with her adopted mother at 10 Anderston Street in Govan and was listed as Eleanor Potter, daughter. Her adopted brothers worked in the shipyards.

She married John McKillop on 7 June 1929 in Anderston District, Glasgow. They were married by William Simpson, the minister of the Finnieston United Free Church. John worked as a subway car driver and Eleanor was mistress of a subway station.

She and John McKillop had one known daughter, Eva McPhail McKillop, in 1932.

Eleanor (Potter) McKillop died in 1967 in Kilpatrick, Dunbarton, Scotland at the age of 69.

_______________
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Potter, Annie (Census 1901 644/10 054/00 017)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Glasgow Kelvinhaugh; ED: 54; Page: 17; Line: 15; Roll: CSSCT1901_307
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Potter, Eleanor (Census 1911 646/02 029/00 002)
Scotland, Statutory Death Registration Index, 1855-2013, 1967 McKillop, Eleanor, 500/01 0132
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1898 McPhail, Eva Hood (Statutory Births 656/02 0449)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1929 McKillop, John - McPhail, Eva Hood (Statutory Marriages 644/11 0139)

Friday, November 21, 2014

Glasgow Subway

The Glasgow subway is the third oldest underground metro system in the world after London and Budapest. Construction began in 1891 and the system opened on 14 December 1896. However, an accident on opening day necessitated closing the new transportation system until 19 January the following year. There were 15 stations and 10 cars were purchased before the metro opened and were painted in a plum and cream livery. Today, the cars are painted red -- a similar color to the London buses.

1896 Opening of the Glasgow Subway; photograph courtesy of the BBC

The original route was circular making about a six and a half mile loop and was constructed at an average depth of 29 feet below the surface. It passes under the Clyde river on the east and west sides of the loop.

Glasgow subway; map courtesy of Mike's Railway History

In 1923 Glasgow Corporation took over operation of the metro. Staff wore the same uniforms as did tramway workers and were dark green with black braid. The uniforms had been introduced at the time of Queen Victoria's funeral in 1901. Those uniforms remained in use until 1977.

2.2.2.2.1. John McKillop (1898-1960)

John McKillop was the only known child of John and Mary (Brodie) McKillop. He was born on 17 July 1898 in Partick Parish, Lanarkshire. By the time he was two years old, his parents had moved back to his mother's hometown of Blantyre, but they returned to the Glasgow area by 1905.

I can find no record of military service for John during World War I.

On 7 June 1929 John McKillop married Eleanor Potter whose birth name was Eva Hood McPhail. They married at 63 St. Vincent Crescent in Glasgow according to the forms of the United Free Church. John worked as a subway car driver and Eleanor as a subway station mistress.  They had one known child, Eva McPhail McKillop, who was born in 1932 in Glasgow.

John McKillop died on 23 October 1960 of pulmonary tuberculosis from which he had suffered for 6 years.  Two days before his death he also suffered from congestive cardiac failure. He died at Rodroyston Hospital, but resided at 308 Netherton Road and was a retired tram car driver. His son-in-law, a Mr. David, registered his death with government authorities.

Glasgow trams circa 1953 on Glasgow-Edinburgh Road; photograph
courtesy of Dewi Williams Home Page

_______________
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 McKillop, John (Census 1901 624/00 005/01 004)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page: 4; Line: 19; Roll: CSSCT1901_246
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 McKillop, John (Census 1911 626/03 026/00 017)
"Glasgow Trams," Dewi Williams' Home page
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1898 McKillop, John (Statutory Births 646/03 1130)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1929 McKillop, John - McPhail, Eva Hood (Statutory Marriages 644/11 0193)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1960 McKillop, John (Statutory Deaths 644/01 0816)

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Southern General Hospital

John McKillop (1868-1944), husband of Mary (Brodie) McKillop, died at Southern General Hospital in 1944. The hospital has a rich history and was originally built as the Govan Combination Poorhouse, which was established in 1852. Its earliest buildings were located in the old cavalry barracks on Eglinton Street.

Administration block of Southern General Hospital, Glasgow; photograph
courtesy of ScotlandsPlaces

In 1872 a new 240-bed Poor Law hospital and 180-patient lunatic asylum were built on present-day Merryflats, Govan. Between 1902 and 1905 large expansions provided 700 more beds. When Govan was annexed by Glasgow, the hospital was managed by the Glasgow Parish Council until 1948 when the National Health Service was formed. The hospital was formally renamed Southern General Hospital in 1923. The last poorhouse beds were taken out of use in 1936.

2.2.2.2. John McKillop (1868-1944)

John McKillop was born on 24 November 1868 at 77 Port Street in the Anderston District of Glasgow. It is on the north bank of the Clyde river and close to the great shipyards of the day. His parents were John and Annie (McRae) McKillop, and his father was a journeyman ship carpenter. By the time John was two years old, the family was living just up the road at 83 Port Street.

When John was 12 years old he was boarding with the Anderson family in Govan Parish, Lanarkshire. He was still attending school. The census record for 1881 is a bit confusing. The enumerator originally listed John as a grandson of John and Janet Anderson, but that was later lined through, and "boarder" added as John's relationship to the head of the household.

Ten years later he was living with his parents again on 12 Hyndland Street and was working as an apprentice carpenter. He married Mary Brodie on 8 April 1898 according to the forms of the Church of Scotland. They were married at 214 Castlebank Street, which is in an area of Glasgow near the Clyde river, but has been totally redeveloped. At the time of their marriage John was working as a timber carter and Mary was a dairy maid.

John and Mary had a son, also named John McKillop, on 17 July 1898, but by 1901 the family had left the Glasgow environs and were living in Mary's home town of Blantyre at 15 Park Street in Dixon's Rows. John was hewing coal for a living. I do not think mining agreed with him, however, as he was back to carting work ten years later.

In 1911, the family lived in Govan Parish and John worked as a coal carter. His father had died in 1907 and by 1915 John and Mary (Brodie) McKillop were renting his parents old home at 12 Hyndland Street for 8 pounds and 15 shillings. Five years later they paid 11 pounds annual rent for the same address. Govan Parish was annexed by Glasgow in 1912.

Current day housing on Netherton Road, Glasgow; photograph courtesy of
Google Maps

John McKillop died three months after his wife, Mary, on 6 May 1944 of senile myocarditis, which is an inflammation of the middle layer of the heart wall. It was apparently due to natural aging. He died in Southern General Hospital, but had been living with his son at 308 Netherton Road before his death. He was a retired removal contractor.

_______________
"Current Day Housing on Netherton Road, Glasgow," Google Maps
1871 Scotland Census, Parish: Glasgow Barony; ED: 79; Page: 6; Line: 4; Roll: CSSCT1871_138
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page: 4; Line: 17; Roll: CSSCT1901_246
1871 Scotland Census, 02/04/1871 McKillop, John (Census 1871 644/08 079/00 006)
1881 Scotland Census, 03/04/1881 McKillop, John (Census 1881 644/11 056/00 003)
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 McKillop, John (Census 1891 646/03 029/00 043)
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 McKillop, John (Census 1901 624/00 005/01 004)
1905 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1905 McKillop, John (Valuation Rolls VR107 / 227 / 656)
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 McKillop, John (Census 1911 646/03 026/00 017)
1915 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1915 MacKillop, John (Valuation Rolls VR107 / 1095 / 136)
1920 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1920 MacKillop, John (Valuation Rolls VR107 / 1281 / 132)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1868 McKillop, John (Statutory Births 644/08 2080)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1898 McKillop, John - Brodie, Mary (Statutory Marriages 646/03 0117)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1944 McKillop, John (Statutory Deaths 644/17 0439)

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Govan Burgh (Glasgow)

John and Mary (Brodie) McKillop lived most of their married life in Govan, which became part of Glasgow in 1912 when the city annexed the area. Govan had lost its rural appearance during the Industrial Revolution. When it became a burgh in 1864, it adopted as it's motto: Nihil Sine Labore -- nothing without work. First, it was a mill town, but shipbuilding was the major industry by the middle of the 1800s.

I found it fascinating that in The Statistical Account of Lanarkshire, Rev. M. Lewishman said in 1840, "In Blaeu's map of the county of Renfrew, however, which was published in Amsterdam in 1662, 'Whyt Inch,' and part of the property called Meadowside, appears as islands...The shallowness of the Clyde not many years ago will almost appear incredible to those who now see ships of 600 tons burthen, and drawing 16 or 17 feet of water, proceeding majestically up that river, and depositing, in the store-houses of Glasgow, the cargoes which they bring from the most remote parts of the world."

Snippet of 1858 British Ordnance Survey of Govan, Lanarkshire; image
courtesy of ScotlandsPlaces

It became a modern well-equipped town during the latter half of the 19th century and the population increased tenfold, from 9,000 in 1864 to 95,000 by 1907.

Aerial view of the Clyde river overlooking Govan and Partick; photograph
courtesy of Glasgow History

Today, it is viewed as a lower working-class area of Glasgow. Few shipyards remain in Govan today. One that does is now part of BAE Systems Surface Ships.

John McKillop's father worked as a carpenter in one the Govan shipyards when John was a born.

2.2.2.2. Mary Brodie (1876-1944)

Mary Brodie was the second child of William and Henrietta (Cassels) Brodie. She was born on 17 September 1876 in Blantyre Parish. By 1881 the family had moved to 20 Park Street in Dixon's Rows off Stonefield Road. At the age of 14 Mary was still living with her family in Dixon's Rows and worked as a domestic servant.

She married John McKillop on 8 April 1898 in the district of Partick in Lanarkshire. They married according to the forms of the Church of Scotland. John was a timber carter and Mary worked in Partick as a dairy maid. Together they had one child, a son, named after his paternal grandfather and father, on 17 July 1898 three months after their marriage.

By 1901 there were over 54,000 people living in Partick; it was rapidly expanding due to the shipbuilding industry on the Clyde river. But John and Mary (Brodie) McKillop had moved back to Mary's birthplace before then and were living at 15 Park Street in Dixon's Rows. John was trying his hand at coal mining. Perhaps the occupation didn't agree with him because by 1911 the family had moved to Govan, which was annexed by Glasgow the next year.

Hyndland Street circa 1910 (at the time part of Partick); image courtesy
of The Glasgow Story

Mary (Brodie) McKillop died on 22 February 1944 at Stobhill Hospital in Glasgow of pulmonary neoplasm and neoplasm of the cheek, or cancer. She was 67 years old. Before her death she was living at 12 Hyndland Street in Glasgow which had been the home of John's father at one time.

_______________
1881 Scotland Census, 03/04/1881 Brodie, William (Census 1881 624/00 008/00 005)
1881 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 8; Page: 5; Line: 15; Roll: CSSCT1881_202
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Brodie, William (Census 1981 624/00 005/00 033)
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page: 34; Line: 1; Roll CSSCT1891_223
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 McKillop, John (Census 1901 646/03 026/00 017)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page: 4; Line: 18; Roll CSSCT1901_246
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 McKillop, John (Census 1911 646/026/00 017)
"Hyndland Street," The Glasgow Story
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1876 Brodie, Mary (Statutory Births 624/00 0226)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1898 McKillop, John - Brodie, Mary (Statutory Marriages 646/03 0117)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1944 McKillop, Mary (Statutory Deaths 644/05 0281)

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

2.2.2.1.6. David Gibson (1905-unknown)

David Gibson was born on 8 February 1905 at Priestfield Mains in Blantyre to Hugh Gibson and Jessie McLean Craig. His father was a coal miner. In 1911 the family lived at 112 Main Street in Blantyre and David attended school. He was his parents' oldest child.

1904 photograph of Main Street in Blantyre; courtesy of the Blantyre Project

On 2 November 1928 David Gibson married Marion Sneddon Lively at the Manse in Blantyre after banns were published and according to the forms of the Church of Scotland. At the time of his marriage, he lived at 17 School Lane in Blantyre and worked on-cost at a colliery. I do know know if he and Marion had children.

David's wife died in 1982 in Blantyre, but I do not know when he died.

_______________
'Main Street in Blantyre in 1904," Blantyre Project
Scotland, 1911 Census, 02/04/1911 Gibson, David (Census 1911 624/00 003/00 005)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2014, 1905 Gibson, David (Statutory Birth Registration 624/00 0120)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2014, 1928 Gibson, David - Lively, Marion Sneddon (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0092)

2.2.2.1.6. Marion Sneddon Lively (1905-1982)

Marion Sneddon Lively born on 15 January 1905 at 11 Park Street in Blantyre to James Lively and Elizabeth Muir Brodie. Her father was a coal miner and the family lived in Dixon's Rows, miners' housing owned by William Dixon, Ltd.

In 1906 Marion's father died of injuries after being trampled by two runaway horses and a lorry on Glasgow Road. Her mother died four years later of tuberculosis. Her three brothers were sent to England to work and Marion was adopted by John and Rachel Hawkins of Bothwell. The couple had been married 8 years but had no children. John Hawkins was a coal miner. A contact through this blog, told me Marion was called May Hawkins after she was adopted. The house in which she and her adopted parents lived had two rooms with at least one window.

On 2 November 1928, Marion married David Gibson at the Manse in High Blantyre after banns were published and according to the forms of the Church of Scotland. Marion was a domestic servant and lived at 73 Broompark Road in Blantyre at the time of her marriage. When the marriage was registered with the Blantyre Registrar, Marion used her birth name. I do not know if the couple had children.

According to a granddaughter of Henrietta (Patterson) Morrison, Henrietta was raised by David and Marion, they were her aunt and uncle.

Marion Sneddon (Lively) Gibson died in 1982 in Blantyre.

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1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Lively, Mowin (Census 1911 625/01 001/00 039)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2014, 1905 Lively, Marion Sneddon (Statutory Births 624/00 0067)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2014, 1928 Gibson, David - Lively, Marion Sneddon (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0092)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2014 Gibson, Marion (Death 574/00 0058)

Soissons Memorial

William Lively's remains were never found or his original burial place was not located, but his name is engraved on the Soissons Memorial.

It is a World War I memorial located in the town of Soissons, in the Aisne department of France. The memorial lists 3,887 names of British soldiers with no known grave who were killed in the area from May to August 1918 during the German Spring Offensive, including the Third Battle of the Aisne and the Second Battle of the Marne.

Soissons Memorial; photograph courtesy of the Commonwealth War
Graves Commission

It is a free-standing memorial, without an associated cemetery, constructed in Portland stone. It was designed by G. H. Holt and V. O. Rees with sculpture by Eric Kennington. The memorial was unveiled on 22 July 1928 by Sir Alexander Hamilton-Gordon, who was a general in World War I, commanding IX Corps from 1916 until the end of the war.

British War Medal and Victory Medal

William Lively was posthumously awarded the British War and Victory medals. His service records did not include the date William entered the British Army, and these medals proved to be good clues as to that date. Because he was not awarded the Star medal, we know he was conscripted. The Military Service Act, which was passed on 27 January 1916, made every British male subject between the ages of 19 and 41, who was unmarried or a widower without dependent children, eligible for conscription. Previous to that time it was a volunteer force.

Victory Medal (left) and British War Medal (right);
photograph courtesy of Online Medals

British War Medal

The British War medal was approved in 1919, for issue to officers and men of the British and Imperial forces who had rendered service between 5 August 1914 and 11 November 1918. Officers and men of the Army were required to have either entered an active theatre of war, or left the United Kingdom for service overseas between 5 August 1914 and 11 November 1918 and completed 28 days of mobilized service. The medal was automatically awarded in the event of death on active service. Some 6,500,00 medals were awarded.

Victory Medal

The Victory medal was designed in accordance with the decision of the Inter-Allied Peace Conference at Versailles. The medal was issued to all those who received the 1914 Star or the 1914-1914 Star, and to most of those who were awarded the British War medal. It was never awarded singly. Some 5,725,000 medals were awarded.

The combination of the two medals is irreverently called "Mutt and Jeff."

Monday, November 17, 2014

2.2.2.1.4. William Lively (1899-1918)

William Lively was the fourth child of James and Elizabeth Muir (Brodie) Lively. He was born on 24 March 1899 at 30 Park Street, Blantyre. When the 1901 census was enumerated, he and his brother, James, were living with their parents at 16 Park Street. After his father was killed in 1906, he, his mother, and brother lived with William's aunt, Martha (Brodie) Moore. After his mother died in 1910, he and his brother went to live with his maternal grandfather and step-grandmother, William and Mary (Campbell) Brodie.

By 1916 he was living in Darwen, Lancashire, England. We do not know why he moved there.

William was conscripted into the British Army and sent to the Infantry Base Depot camps on the French coast on 31 March 1918, likely the 40th Infantry Base Depot at the great complex of camps at Etaples as William's draft was penciled in to go to the 18th (Service) Battalion of the Welsh Regiment. That unit was decimated on 9 April 1918 during the early days of the German spring offensive. Instead, William's draft was transferred into the 1/4 Battalion of the East Yorkshire Regiment on 19 April 1918 as replacements. Little more than a month later, he was dead at the age of 19.

Craonne after the fighting; image courtesy of 1/4 Battalion, Alexandra,
Princess of Wales, Own Yorkshire Regiment website

The Third Battle Aisne began with a German attack on Allied positions at Chemin des Dames ridge. It was a surprise attack that started with an artillery bombardment, which inflicted heavy losses. The Germans followed with a poison gas drop. Caught completely off-guard and with their lines spread thin, the British did not stop the advance until the Germans were well across the Aisne river. They had smashed through eight Allied divisions and captured 50,000 soldiers.

William Lively's regiment had been moved into the battle line during the night of 26 May from reserve area at Beaurieux. They faced the German Seventh Army just north of Craonne. British officers protested this move, but were assured by the French, it was a quiet area.

From a report by the British Commander, Sir Douglas Haig:

"These divisions had been heavily engaged during the past month, three having been twice and one three times withdrawn from the battle line and again engaged after being reformed. They, therefore, had few experienced officers and men when they arrived in Champagne, and were again filled up by immature and half-trained lads fresh from home whose training had to be completed. In these circumstances the division could not be considered fit for heavy fighting for some time to come. Notwithstanding this they were ordered into the front line almost at once by the French Commander, who countered British objections by declaring that as the front was a quiet one, and as no attack was to be expected, it would be possible to continue the training of the troops, while in the line and that the French Divisions, urgently required elsewhere could thus be relieved."

Beginning at 1:00 a.m. the next morning, the regiment was heavily shelled and outflanked on both sides and by the end of the day's fighting had been decimated. William Lively was one of many soldiers killed in action that day. His body was never recovered but his name is inscribed on the War Memorial at Soissons in the Picard region of France. Posthumously, William was awarded the British War and Victory medals.

William Lively's named as engraved on the War Memorial in Soissons;
photograph courtesy of Find A Grave member Misty & Company

Unfortunately, most of William Lively's war records were lost in September 1940 when a German Luftwaffe bombing raid struck the War Office Repository in London. However, unit war diaries still exist. The 50th Division's war diary, which described the fighting the day William died is poignant:

"No less than 227 officers and 4,879 other ranks were killed, wounded or captured during the battle. Practically all those casualties occurring on the 27th, for after that date, the 50th Division became intermingled with other divisions, which were in a like condition; only a mere handful of the infantry remained."

His hometown of Blantyre, Scotland, has a war memorial with its World War I dead inscribed on it, but William's name is not among them.

*NOTE: The 150th Brigade of the 50th Division was comprised of three battalions: 1/4 Battalion of the East Yorkshire Regiment, 1/4 Battalion of Yorkshire Regiment, and the 1/5 Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment. All of the battalions were positioned near Craonne above the Aisne river on 27 May 1918 and suffered the same fate. So the battle photo of Craonne after the fighting is relevant to this post even though William Lively did not serve in that battalion.

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1/4 Battalion, Alexandra, Princess of Wales, Own Yorkshire Regiment, http://homepage.ntlworld.com/bandl.danby/001BnIndex.html
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Lively, Elizabeth (Census 1901 624/00 005/01 005)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 5; Page 5; Line: 7; Roll: CSSCT1901_246
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Brodie, William (Census 1911 624/00 007/00 018)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1899 Lively, William (Statutory Births 624/00 0172)
Birmingham Gazette, 29 May 1918
Dundee Courier, 30 May 1918
Global, Find A Grave Index for Non-Burials, Burials at Sea, and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current, William Lively
"Soissons Memorial," Commonwealth Graves Commission
The Birmingham Mail, 28 May 1918
UK, British Army WWI Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920, William Lively, 42292
UK, British Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects, 1901-1929, NAM Accession Number: 1991-02-333; Record Number Ranges: 895001-896500; Reference: 548
UK, Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Grave Registration, Index No. M.R. 18, Soissons Memorial, Part Two (G-M), Lively, William, 42292
UK, Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Commemorative Certificate, Lively, William, 42292
UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, William Lively, 42292
UK, WWI Service Medals and Awards Rolls, 1914-1920, William Lively, 42292

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Children of John and Henrietta (Paterson) Morrison

John Morrison and Henrietta Paterson had four children:

2.2.2.1.1.3.1 John Morrison (1944- )

John Morrison was in 1944 likely in Blantyre or Bellshill. However, four babies named John Morrison were born in 1944 in those to parishes so I cannot be sure which one is the correct John Morrison. His daughter currently lives in England.

2.2.2.1.1.3.2. Alexander Paterson Morrison (1946)

Alexander Paterson Morrison was born in 1946 in Blantyre.

2.2.2.1.1.3.3. Elizabeth Morrison (1951- )

Elizabeth Brodie Morrison was born in 1951 in Blantyre. She was raised by her aunt and uncle, David and Marison Sneddon (Lively) Gibson, as her mother had a stroke after her birth.

2.2.2.1.1.3.4. Norman Morrison (1915-1915)

Norman Morrison was born in 1955 in Bellshill. There is no death registration for him so I assume he died hours after birth. His niece indicated he died as an infant.

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Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2014, 1946 Morrison, Alexander Paterson (Statutory Births 624/00 0339)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2014, 1951 Morrison, Elizabeth Brodie (Statutory Births 624/00 0221)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2014, 1955 Morrison, Norman (Statutory Births 625/03  0961)

2.2.2.1.1.3. John Morrison (1919-1982)

John Morrison was likely born on 2 December 1919 in Blantyre to John and Rose (McGuinness) Morrison. He married Henrietta Paterson in 1943 in Blantyre. The couple had four children. According to his granddaughter, John Morrison died in 1982 in Carluke. I can find no supporting index entry on ScotlandsPeople. However, this does not mean it does not exist.

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Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2014, 1919 Morrison, John (Statutory Births 624/00 0576)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2014, 1943 Morrison, John - Paterson, Henrietta (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0079)

2.2.2.1.1.3. Henrietta Paterson (1923-1980)

According to her granddaughter, Henrietta Paterson was born on 20 June 1923 to Alexander and Henrietta Cassels (Lively) Paterson. She was their youngest child. She married John Morrison in 1943 in Blantyre. The couple had four children. I was able to confirm the years in which these events took place on ScotlandsPeople. However, There is a 100-year privacy restriction for viewing actual birth registrations online; a 75-year restriction for marriage registrations; and a 60-year restriction for deaths. So I cannot yet provide specific dates or other details.

Her granddaughter stated that Henrietta had difficulties after each birth, suffering from strokes. She was unable to raise her youngest daughter, who went to live with her aunt, Marion Sneddon (Lively) Gibson.

Her granddaughter believed Henrietta (Patterson) Morrison died on 20 January 1980 in Carluke. However, I have not been able to find a confirming index entry on ScotlandsPeople.

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Ancestry.com messages with jgmg17
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2014, 1923 Paterson, Henrietta (624/00 0283)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2014, 1943, Morrison, John - Paterson, Henrietta (624/00 0079)

Photograph of John Burnside and Annie Fisher (Wightman) Paterson

Annie Fisher (Wightman) Paterson and John Burnside Paterson; graciously shared by
Susan Hughes

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Annie Fisher (Wightman) Paterson and John Burnside Paterson; Susan Hughes

Children of Alexander and Henrietta Cassels (Lively) Paterson

2.2.2.1.1.1. John Burnside Paterson (1912-1973)

John Burnside Paterson was born five months after his parents' marriage on 6 November 1912 at 24 Hunthill in Blantyre Parish. He married Annie Wightman in 1943 at Bellshill. Annie was born in Hamilton in 1920. John died in 1973 in Blantyre and Annie died in 1991 at the age of 71.

2.2.2.1.1.2. James Lively Paterson (1913-unknown)

According to the statutory birth registration index on ScotlandsPeople, James Lively Paterson was born in 1913 in Blantyre Parish. A digital image of his birth registration record will not become available until 2014.

More children may have been born to Alexander and Henrietta Cassels (Lively) Paterson but they could not be identified using the index of birth registrations available on ScotlandsPeople.

2.2.2.1.1.3. Henrietta Paterson

The lives of Henrietta Pater and her husband, John Morrison, will be covered in future posts.

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Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1912 Paterson, John Burnside (Statutory Births 624/00 0571)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2013, 1915 Paterson, James Lively (Statutory Births 624/00 0227)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2013, 1920 Wightman, Annie Fisher (Statutory Births 647/00 0118)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2013, 1943 Paterson, John - Wightman, Annie (Statutory Marriages 625/03 0046)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2013, 1973 Paterson, John Burnside (Statutory Deaths 574/00 0013)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations Index, 1855-2013, 1991 Paterson, Annie Fisher (Statutory Deaths 574/00 0110)

Saturday, November 15, 2014

2.2.2.1.1. Alexander Paterson: Register of Corrected Entries

When the death of Alexander Paterson was registered with the Blantyre Parish registrar on 12 April 1944, the registration listed his cause of death as "smothered, asphyxia (pit accident)."  The registered of corrected entries entered on 9 June 1944 provided more detail, "Deceased, while in the course of his employment was buried by a fall of stone and dirt from a roof and died from asphyxiation per finding and sheriff."

Register of Corrected Entries for Alexander Paterson; courtesy of ScotlandsPeople

2.2.2.1.1. Alexander Paterson (1886-1944)

Alexander Paterson was born on 16 June 1886 in Orchardhead, Blantyre, to John and Marion (Scoular) Paterson. Alexander's father worked as a pithead man in the local colliery. In 1891, he and his family were living in the Lyons Buildings on Hamilton Road in Blantyre; and 10 years later they were living in Hunthill in the same parish. Alexander was 14 years old and already working as a general laborer.

In 1911 Alexander was living with his family at 24 Hunthill Road and he was working as a pit man. He married Henrietta Cassels Lively the next year on 28 June 1912 at his home. They were married according to the forms of the Church of Scotland by C. Scrimgeour Turnbull. Henrietta Cassels Brodie and Nathaniel Thomson were witnesses. Henrietta Brodie was actually the bride's aunt but was three months younger. She and Nathaniel were married the next year.

According to a granddaughter, Alexander and Henrietta had three children.

Hunthill Road circa 1915; photograph courtesy of The Blantyre Project

Valuation rolls were kept by each parish, and were a survey of property. They were published annually on Whitsun (15 May in Scotland). Local council officials used the rolls to levy local rates for services like poor relief, education and public health. The 1915 valuation roll indicated Alexander Paterson was a miner and rented 29 Hunthill Road  in High Blantyre from James Malcolm for 5 pounds, 10 shillings yearly. He was paying the same amount in 1920.

On 12 April 1944 at about 2:45 a.m., while working at the No. 2 Blantyre Colliery as a machine man, Alexander Paterson, was buried by a fall of stone and dirt from the mine roof and died from asphyxiation. His widow, Henrietta Cassels (Lively) Paterson, died four years later.

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1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Blantyre; ED: 3; Page: 37; Line: 21; Roll: SCCCT_245
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Paterson, Alexander (Census 1891 624/00 003/00 030)
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Paterson, Alexander (Census 1901 624/00 003/01 037)
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Paterson, Alexander (Census 1911 624/00 003/00 040)
1915 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1915 Paterson, Alexander (Valuation Rolls VR107 / 305 / 680)
1920 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1920 Paterson, Alexander (Valuation Rolls VR107 / 340 / 310)
Hunthill Road circa 1915, The Blantyre Project
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1886 Paterson, Alexander (Statutory Births 624/00 0234)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1912 Paterson, Alexander - Lively, Henrietta (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0032)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1944 Paterson, Alexander (Statutory Deaths 624/00 0039)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1944 Paterson, Alexander (Statutory Deaths 624/00 0039) (RCE)

Friday, November 14, 2014

2.2.2.1.1. Henrietta Cassels Lively (1892-1948)

Henrietta Cassels Lively was James and Elizabeth Muir (Brodie) Lively's eldest child and only daughter. She was born on 12 April 1892 in her parents home at 5 Park Street in Dixon's Rows, Blantyre. Her family called her "Nettie." When the 1901 census was enumerated on the last day of March, she was a patient at the Isolation Hospital, which was part of the Middle Ward Hospital in Dalziel Parish. I have not found her in the 1911 census.

Middle Ward Hospital in Dalziel Parish from the 1896 British Ordnance
Survey; courtesy of ScotlandsPlaces

She lost her brother, James Lively, in early 1894 though she may not have been old enough at the time to remember him. Her father lost his life in an accident on Glasgow Road in 1906 and in 1910 her mother died of tuberculosis, leaving Henrietta and her brothers orphans. Her youngest brother, William, had been conscripted into the British Army likely during 1916 and was killed in action in 1918. Hers was a life filled with tragedy and more was to follow when her husband was killed in a mine accident in 1944.

On 28 June 1912, at the age of 20, Henrietta married Alexander Paterson. They both listed 24 Hunthill Road, Blantyre, as their place of residence. Henrietta worked in a firewood factory and Alexander was a coal miner.

In April 1919 Henrietta received a little over 4 pounds from the British Army. It was a distribution of the effects of her brother, William, who was killed in action during World War I.

We know that by 1923 the United Kingdom had established a firewood factory for the employment of tuberculous ex-service men, which offered remunerative employment for unskilled labor. Perhaps, such factories were also set up in Scotland and this was where Henrietta was working at the time of her marriage.

According to a granddaughter the couple had three children. They had their eldest child five months after their marriage.

Henrietta Cassels (Lively) Paterson died at Hairmyres Hospital in East Kilbride on 11 July 1948 at the age of 58. The cause of death was chronic cholecystitis, biliary calculi, suppurative cholangitis, which are the medical terms for issues with the gall bladder. She had been a widow for four years and lived at 73 Broompark Road in High Blantyre before her death.

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1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Lively, Nettie (Census 1901 639/00 033/00 003)
Bardswell, Noel Dean, Work Centers for the Tuberculous: The Experience of the Spero Firewood Factory, (London:John Bale & Sons & Danielson, 1930)
Ordnance Survey, 25-Inch-to-the-Mile, Lanarkshire, Sheet 12.13, 1896
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1892 Lively, Henrietta (Statutory Births 624/00 0174)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1912 Paterson, Alexander - Lively, Henrietta (Statutory Marriages 624/00 0032)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1948 Paterson, Henrietta (Statutory Deaths 643/00 0120)
The Workhouse, http://www.workhouses.org