Saturday, April 30, 2016

2.12.10.2. Roy Frank Potter (1919-unknown)

Roy Frank Potter was born on 3 December 1919 in Oregon to Roy R. Potter and Rachel Ida Van Fossen. When the 1920 census was enumerated the family lived at 202 SW Boundary Street in Portland, Oregon, and Roy's father worked as a salesman selling wholesale pants. His parents divorced a few years later.

Roy's mother married Ray W. Lee in 1927 and Roy lived with his mother and step-father in Tacoma, Washington, where his step-father worked as an engineer for an elevator company. Roy's mother divorced Ray Lee sometime before the 1940 census was enumerated. Roy lived at 911 S 27th Street in Tacoma and worked as a millworker.

He was drafted into the U.S. Army on 17 June 1942 in Tacoma, Washington. Six months later, on 2 January 1943, he married Helen Isabel Muir in Phenix City, Alabama, while stationed at Ft. Benning, where he attended Infantry Officers Candidate School. According to my grandmother's genealogy notebook, the couple had two children.

When Roy's father-in-law died in 1957, Roy and his family lived in Riverside, California.

His wife died in 1981 and in 1993 Roy lived in Bellingham, Washington.

I have been unable to find any information about Roy's date or place of death.

_______________
1920 US Federal Census, Census Place: Portland, Multnomah, Oregon; Roll: T625_ 1499; Page: 7B; Enumeration District: 46; Image: 1065
1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Tacoma, Pierce, Washington; Roll: 2512; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0175; Image: 676.0; FHL microfilm: 2342246
Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, page 24
Seattle Times, 8 November 1942
US, Alabama Marriage Collection, 1800-1969, 1943 Potter, Roy F.
US, Alabama Marriage License Record, 1943 Potter, Roy F. - Muir, Helen I.
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1940 Tacoma, WA (Roy Potter)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1993 Bellingham, WA (Roy F Potter)
US, World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946, 1942 Potter, Roy F.

2.12.10.2. Helen Isabel Muir (1921-1981)

Helen Isabel Muir was born on 19 August 1921 in Seattle, Washington, to Alexander Muir and Bertha Cloren. She was their second child and her father was a fireman for the city of Seattle.  Her father was injured on the job and the family moved to Island County, Washington, about 1924. Helen's mother died in 1929 following a difficult pregnancy and delivery. Her father moved the family back to Seattle in 1930 and became a fire inspector for the fire department.

Helen attended the University of Washington in Seattle in 1940 and lived with her widowed father and younger sister. She graduated in 1942 from the Arts and Sciences program and was a vice president of Gamma Alpha Chi. The purpose of the organization was to give practical training with the help of professionals to aid in eventually establishing an advertising school at the University.

Helen Muir, University of Washington Senior Class photograph; University
of Washington Tyee

Helen married Roy Frank Potter on 2 January 1943 in Phenix City, Alabama. At the time of her marriage she lived at 2901 North Fulton Drive in Atlanta, Georgia, and Roy was stationed at Ft. Benning, in nearby Chattahoochie County, Georgia.

According to my grandmother's genealogy notebook, the couple had two sons:
  1. Matthew Potter
  2. Andrew Potter
I have been unable to trace the sons to date.

When Helen's father died in 1957, she and Roy lived in Riverside, California. Helen Isabel (Muir) Potter died on 25 February 1981 in Whatcom County, Washington. Her remains were cremated.

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'Helen Muir Senior Class Photograph,' Ancestry.com
1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: 2494; Page: 15A; Enumeration District: 0044; Image: 350.0; FHL microfilm: 2342228
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: T627_4379; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 40-174
Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, page 24
Global, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, Memorial No. 157606656
US, Alabama Marriage Collection, 1800-1969, 1943 Muir, Helen I. 

US, Alabama Marriage License Record, 1943 Potter, Roy F. - Muir, Helen I.
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1940 Seattle, WA (Helen Muir)
US, School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, 1940 University of Washington Tyee, pages 151 and 385
US, School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, 1941 University of Washington Tyee, pages 178, 599 and 823
US, School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, 1942 University of Washington Tyee, pages 64, 85, 340, 502, 757 and 809

Friday, April 29, 2016

Alexander Rodney Muir Obituary

As published in the Seattle Times, 3 March 2002

MUIR, Alexander "Rod" R. -- Born January 23, 1942 in Seattle to Alexander E. and Minerva B. (Hansen) Muir; passed way February 27, 2002 at age 60. Survived by his loving uncles and aunts, Morris C. Hansen of Seattle, James and Elsie Hansen of Everson, Lars A. Hansen of New Mexico, Frances Nikas of California, Dora and Robert Burns of Wisconsin, Margaret and John Montford, Molly and Paul Callahan of Arizona. Also survived by many cousins and numerous friends. Memorial Service Saturday, March 9, 2 p.m. Evergreen-Washelli Funeral Home Chapel, 1111 Aurora Ave. N, Seattle. Memorials suggested to Evergreen Hospice, 12822 - 124th Lane N.E., Kirkland WA 98034.

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Seattle Times, 3 March 2002

2.12.10.1.1. Rodney Alexander Muir (1942-2002)

Rodney Alexander Muir was born on 23 January 1942 in Klipsan Beach, Washington, to Alexander Eugene Muir and Minerva B. Hansen. He was their only known son and his father served in the U.S. Coast Guard at the time of his birth. In 1960 Rod lived with his parents in Seattle at 7744 18th Avenue SW and was a student at Chief Stealth High School. He made the National Honor Society that year.

Rodney Alexander Muir High School Yearbook Senior Class;
photograph Chief Stealth High School, page 94

In 1999, the year his father died, he lived in Edmonds, Washington. His mother died in 2001 and Rod died the following year on 27 February 2002. I do not believe he married or had children.

_______________
'Rodney Alexander Muir High School Senior photograph,' Ancestry.com
Seattle Daily Times, 29 January 1942
Seattle Times, 3 March 2002
US, City Directories 1822-1995, 1960 Seattle, WA (A. Rodney Muir)
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002, 1999 Alexander R. Muir (Edmonds, WA)
US, School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, 1960 Chief Stealth High School, pages 94 and 103
US, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Number: 533-38-7377
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Number: 533-38-7377; Issue State: Washington; Issue Date: 1956-1957

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Chignik, Alaska

Chignik, Alaska, is on the Chignik Bay on the Alaskan Peninsula about 200 miles past Kodiak and above the Aleutian Islands. It is still a remote fishing village in a remote region of Alaska based around two fish plants.

Chignik, Alaska; map courtesy of Chignik Bay Adventures

By the time Minerva Hansen was born there, Chignik was a growing area and the canneries continued to draw people. A summer school had opened in 1903 on the southside of Chignik Bay where a number of Euroamerican men had begun a new settlement. This is where the community, informally known as Andersonville, was established. It was likely named for George Anderson, Minerva's maternal grandfather. St. Nicholas chapel was on the north side of the bay and the residents of Andersonville would paddle across the bay to attend Orthodox services. Also, on the north side were several Native Aleutian communities.

According to Michelle Morseth's book, Chignik Bay "became an early geographical boundary between the new community of immigrant men married to local women, and the local Native community. The distinction between the two communities was soon evident since, for many families, establishment of a separate community meant a rejection of Native culture and Russian Orthodoxy.

The bay continued to support two villages for 13 years. The south side became a permanent year-round village with a school, health clinic, and airstrip. Few residents on the north side survived the 1919 epidemic and the old village was abandoned soon after.

Andersonville circa 1909; image courtesy of the Alaska State
Archives

Father Modestov, an Orthodox priest, visited Chignik Bay in 1909, seven short years before Minerva was born, and left a description of the village on the north side:

"We arrived in Chignik at 10am and were met by the people on the shore. They took us in a boat to Vvendskoe (north side village), which is half an hour away on the other side of the bay. The village consisting of 2-3 barabaras was founded about ten years ago. In 1907/08 upon the priest's requests, the inhabintants built a church in the name of the Entry (vvendeniye) of Virgin Mary into the Temple. Since then the village has grown. Orthodox from Nushagak mission and Afognak parish moved here. People from other villages are also settling down here since there is a number of local conveniences. There is a lot of fuel in the area and it is close at hand; there is an ample supply of salmon; there are stores and a post office, and two fish canneries where people can get jobs. There is a doctor and the priest visits this settlement every year. Eskimos, Aglemiuts and creoles do not have such conveniences in their old places and, therefore, are settling down in Chignik abandoning their old residences."

________________
'Andersonville circa 1909,' Alaska State Archives
Chignik Bay, Alaska, Chignik Bay Adventures

Creoles: A Social Experiment

Russians began exploring Alaska during the reign of Peter I "the Great." Soon they began establishing trading posts in order to acquire furs from the Native Alaskan people. Eventually, the Russian-American Company was established to maximize the economic potential of Alaska for the benefit of Russia. As a result most of the Russians, who came to Alaska, were men. Michele Morseth explains the Creole Estate in her book, Puyulek Pu'irtuq! The People of the Volcanoes:

"As the number of persons of mixed ancestry...with some education provided through the efforts of their fathers and grandfathers grew, the company established guidelines for a social experiment -- creation of a social stratum with loyalties both to Alaska and to the Russian culture and state. Thus, the Creole estate was officially established...The company recognized that children of Russian males and aboriginal females would create unbreakable bonds between the new colony and the old country. In 1816 the main office of the Russian-American Company explained the program:

'From a political point of view, the ties of the Russians with the Aleuts are nearly essential, both for exposing hostile schemes, and for permanent ties, for the resultant offspring willy-nilly join those Aleuts who are related to the Russians and the children, being christened, will be Russians, and not Aleuts, and so the new generation is permanently Russian...The lack of Russian people in the colonies can be compensated for...Creoles, brought up and educated at the Company's cost and effort, thereafter employed in the various capacities, or carrying on its business, can obtain food and livelihood.

The Creoles comprise a particular class and enjoy all the privileges of the lower middle class accorded by Russian law. There is this difference -- they do not pay taxes and are not attached to the government by any formal tie; when they have been educated by the company, they must serve it for a period of ten years. The company has undertaken the education of this class with praiseworthy energy; many Creoles have studied at higher institutions of learning in St. Petersburg or have been instructed in various branches of the arts and sciences. Many have received their education in the colonies and are considered to be almost the equal of the Russians. Most of the Creoles hold responsible positions, among them, for example, are the post of bookkeeper, warehouse overseer, captain's assistant and the position of captain itself, church officials, etc. All Creoles are conversant in Russian, but not with the Aleut nor the Kodiak languages. Their way of life is the same as that of the Russians'."

In reality the Creoles of Alaska were in a somewhat ambiguous position. Native Alaskans showed them disrespect as they were products of illegal unions with the natives. Toward the end of the Russian rule, they reversed their Creole policy and encouraged most Creoles to live a native lifestyle.

After the United States purchased Alaska in 1867, most Russian-born men returned home. Some Creoles joined them, but it is believed most stayed in Alaska. Soon after the transfer of Alaska to the United States, scientist, William Dall, referred to Creoles as "half breeds," saying they were "unfit to exercise franchise as American citizens." He failed to realize they were educated and had filled many important positions within the Russian-American Company.

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Morseth, Michele. Puyulek Pu'irtuq! The People of the Volcanoes, (Hong Kong: National Park Service, 1998), pages 1-207

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Minerva B. (Hansen) Muir Obituary

As published in the Seattle Times, 1 February 2001:

MUIR, Minerva "Min"
Born: July 3, 1915 in Chignik, Alaska
Passed away January 30, 2001

Preceded in death by husband Alexander; brothers Howard and Dan. Survived by son Rodney of Edmonds; brothers Jim Hansen, Bellingham; Lars Hansen, Liberal, Kansas; Morris Hansen, Seattle. Sisters Dora Burns, Eau Clair, WI; Peggy Montfort, Flagstaff, AZ, and Molly Callahan, Yuma, AZ.

Memorial Service, Saturday, February 3, 11:00 a.m., Bleitz Funeral Home, 316 Florentia St., Seattle.

_______________
Seattle Times, 1 February 2001

2.12.10.1. Minerva B. Hansen (1916-2001)

Minerva B. Hansen was born on 3 Jul 1916 in Chignik, Alaska, a village on the Aleutian Peninsula to Lars Antone Hansen and Nancy J. Anderson. Her father had immigrated from Norway in 1909 and her mother was considered mixed race -- American, Russian, and Aleutian, a Native Alaska tribe. She was called "Creole" on many of the documents of the time.

In 1920 Minerva and her family lived next door to her maternal grandparents in Chignik and her father worked as a fisherman. He likely sold his catch to the local cannery, which was the main employer in the village. Minerva's father was naturalized in 1924 and became a U.S. citizen. However, when the 1930 census was enumerated, Minerva's mother was listed as a widow and lived in Chignik with her eight children.

I am not sure how Minerva and Alexander Eugene Muir met. He may have been stationed in Alaska or perhaps Minerva traveled to the west coast of the United States after her mother married and placed most of her children in an orphanage. By 1940, though, Alexander and Minerva were married. He was a 3rd class radioman stationed on the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Pulaski, which was based at Coos Bay, Oregon. Minerva boarded at the home of Pearl Frazier in nearby Marshfield, Oregon. Alexander and Minerva had one known son over the course of their marriage.

It is interesting to note that when Minerva lived in Alaska, her race was considered mixed even though she could have been no more than 12.5 percent Native Alaskan. When she lived in Oregon her race was listed as white.

After Alexander was discharged from the Coast Guard, the family settled in Seattle, Washington, where Alexander worked as a mechanic for United Airlines.

Alexander died in 1999 and Minerva died on 30 January 2001 in Edmonds, Washington.

_______________
1920 US Federal Census, Census Place: Unga Peninsula, Third Judicial District, Alaska Territory; Roll: T625_2031; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 2; Image: 298
1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Unga, Third Judicial District, Alaska Territory; Roll: 2628; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 0026; Image: 264.0; FHL microfilm: 2342362
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Marshfield, Coos, Oregon; Roll: T627_3358; Page: 61A; Enumeration District: 6-12
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1958 Seattle, WA (Alex E. Muir and Minerva B. Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1960 Seattle, WA (Alex E. Muir and Minerva B. Muir)
US, Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current, 2001 Muir, Minerva "Min" (Hansen)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Muir, Minerva B. (Seattle, WA)
US, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Number: 543-12-0603
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Number: 543-12-0603; Issue State: Oregon; Issue Date: Before 1951

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Alexander Eugene Muir Obituary

As published in the Seattle Times, 4 November 1999:

MUIR, Alex -- Age 82, died November 2, 1999. Survived by wife, Min; son, Rod; and sister, Frances Nikas. No Services. Remembrances to Evergreen Hospice or a charity of your choice. Arrangements by Bleitz Funeral Home, Seattle.

_______________
Seattle Times, 4 November 1999

2.12.10.1. Alexander Eugene Muir (1917-1999)

Alexander Eugene Muir was born on 30 January 1917 in Seattle, Washington, to Alexander Muir and Bertha Cloren. His father worked as a fireman for the city fire department at the time of Alexander's birth. The family was enumerated in the 1920 as living at 643 97th Street. Alexander's father retired from the fire department later that year due to an injury and the family moved to Island County, Washington, some time before 1924.

When Alexander was 12 years old, his mother died from complications related to childbirth. The next year the Alexander, his father, and younger siblings moved back to Seattle. He father rejoined the fire department and the family lived at 347 West 53rd Street.

Alexander Eugene Muir married Minerva B. Hansen sometime before 1940. She was the daughter of Lars Hansen and Nancy J. Anderson and had been born in Alaska.  By 1940 Alexander had joined the U.S. Coast Guard and was stationed aboard the USCG Cutter Pulaski (WPC-149) and worked as a 3rd radioman. The cutter's home port was Coos Bay, Oregon. Alexander's wife lodged in nearby Marshfield. The couple had one known child over the course of their marriage.

USCGC Pulaski (WPC-149), circa 1935; photograph courtesy of U.S. Coast
Guard

By 1960 the family lived at 7744 18th Avenue SW and Alexander worked as a mechanic for United Air Lines.

Alexander Eugene Muir died on 2 November 1999 in Edmonds, Washington. His wife, Minerva, died two years later.

________________
'USCGC Pulaski (WPC-149),' U.S. Coast Guard
1920 US Federal Census, Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: T625_1926; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 99; Image: 234
1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: 2494; Page: 15A; Enumeration District: 0044; Image: 350.0; FHL microfilm: 2342228
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Marshfield, Coos, Oregon; Roll: T627_3358; Page: 64A; Enumeration District: 6-7
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1958 Seattle WA (Alex E Muir and Minerva B Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1960 Seattle, WA (Alex E Muir and Minerva B Muir)
US, Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current, 1999 Muir, Alex
US, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Number: 532-22-4087
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Number: 532-22-4087; Issue State: Washington; Issue Date: Before 1951
US, Washington Births, 1907-1919, 1917 Muir, Alexander Eugene
US, Washington Birth Records, 1870-1935, Muir, Alexander Eugene

Monday, April 25, 2016

Children of Alexander Muir and Bertha Isabel Cloren

2.12.10.1. Alexander Eugene Muir (1917-1999)

The lives of Alexander Eugene Muir and his wife, Minerva B. Hansen, will be covered in future posts.

2.12.10.2. Helen Isabel Muir (1921-1981)

The lives of Helen Isabel Muir and her husband, Roy Frank Potter, will be covered in future posts.

2.12.10.3. Joe Arthur Muir (1923-1923)

Joe Arthur Muir was born in 1923 and died on 6 May 1923 in Seattle, Washington. His age was listed in the death index as 0 so my assumption is he died shortly after birth.

2.12.10.4. Frances Beverly Muir (1924-2013)

The lives of Frances Beverly Muir and her husbands, 1) Jack Thatcher King and 2) Nicholas Nikas, will be covered in future posts.

2.12.10.5. James Muir (1927-1927)

James Muir was born on 13 June 1927 in Greenbank, Washington. He died on 17 June 1927 in the same city.

_______________
US, Washington Deaths, 1883-1960, 1923 Muir, Joe Arthur
US, Washington Deaths, 1883-1960, 1927 Muir, James
US, Washington Select Death Certificates, 1907-1960, 1923 Muir, Joe Arthur
US, Washington Select Death Certificates, 1907-1960, 1927 Muir, James

2.12.10 Bertha Cloren (1882-1929)

Bertha Cloren was born on 22 August 1882 in Ardmore, Missouri, to John Patrick Cloren and Janet Ann Milnes, Irish immigrants who married after they arrived in the United States. John Cloren's surname was spelled Killoren in Ireland. When the 1900 census was enumerated, Bertha and her family lived in Nineveh Township, Missouri, and her father worked as a coal miner. He died in 1908 and in 1910 Bertha, her widowed mother, and siblings lived in Novinger, Missouri, a town in the Nineveh Township. Two of her brothers supported the family by working in the coal mines like their father.

Bertha married Alexander Muir on 13 June 1914 in the Justice of the Peace's office in Kirksville, Missouri. Bertha was nearly seven years older than her husband. Alexander had moved to Seattle the previous year and worked as a fireman for the city. The couple returned to Seattle and had five known children during the course of their marriage. Only three survived infancy, however.

The family lived 643 97th Street when the 1920 census was enumerated. According to the census, Alexander and Bertha owned the home. Alexander retired from the fire department later that year after an injury, and sometime before 1923 the family had moved to Whidbey Island, which is a large island at the mouth of the Puget Sound. The family moved to Everett, Washington, on 15 October 1929.

Bertha died on 19 October 1929 at Everett General Hospital in Everett of puerperal sepsis, prolonged, difficult labor and birth of hydrocephalic monstrosity according to her death certificate. Hydrocephalic monstrosity was a term then in use for a baby born with spina bifida. There is no record of the child's birth or death so my assumption is that it did not survive.

Bertha (Cloren) Muir's body was cremated.

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1900 US Federal Census, Census Place: Nineveh, Adair, Missouri; Roll: 836; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 0011; FHL microfilm: 1240836
1910 US Federal Census, Census Place: Novinger, North Ward, Adair, Missouri; Roll: T624_766; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 0017; FHL microfilm: 1374779
1920 US Federal Census, Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: T625_1926; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 99; Image: 234
Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, page 24
US, Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002, 1914 Muir, Alexander - Cloren, Bertha
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1915 Seattle, WA (Alex and Bertha Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1916 Seattle, WA (Alex and Bertha Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1917 Seattle, WA (Alex and Bertha I Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1918 Seattle, WA (Alex and Bertha Muir)
US, Washington Death Certificate, Year: 1929; Record No. 321; Registered No. 340
US, Washington Deaths, 1883-1960, 1929 Muir, Bertha
US, Washington Select Death Certificates, 1907-1960, 1929 Muir, Bertha (Cloran)

Sunday, April 24, 2016

USS California (ACR-6)

The USS California (ACR-6) was the second ship so named in the U.S. Navy. It was an armored cruiser and the only one of the Pennsylvania cruiser class built. She was launched in 1904 by Union Iron Works of San Francisco.

She joined the 2nd Division, Pacific Fleet, and took part in a Naval review in San Francisco in May 1908. She cruised to Hawaii and Samoa in the autumn of 1909 and then operated mostly along the west coast of the United States, training and drilling her sailors.

She sailed to Hawaii in December 1911 and then in early 1912 sailed to the Asiatic Station where she joined other ships stationed in the Far East representing American power and prestige. She returned home from the Asiatic Station in August 1912 and was quickly sent to Corinto, Nicaragua, which was then in the throes of a political disturbance. Her primary objective was to protect American lives and property.

She then kept a watchful eye on Mexico, which was also suffering from political disturbances, by sailing in Pacific coastal waters. While there the USS California was involved in an international incident in which two of her crew were shot and killed.

She was renamed the USS San Diego sometime before 1915 and at one time was the flagship of the Pacific Fleet.

USS California (ACR-6) circa 1915 after she had been renamed USS San Diego;
photograph courtesy of Wikipedia

On 19 July 1918 she was sunk off Long Island by a German mine.

Alexander Muir was stationed aboard the USS California when the 1910 census was enumerated. According to his World War I draft registration card, he had served in the U.S. Navy for four years. So he likely participated in the events in Nicaragua and Mexico and perhaps the ship's initial cruise to the Far East.

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USS California (ACR-6) circa 1915,' Wikipedia

"Streatorland"

A version of this post first appeared on Tangled Roots and Trees on 18 May 2014.

Alexander Muir, the first child of James and Margaret (Semple) Muir was born in a coal patch called Coalville in Streator, Illinois.

At one time, Streator was one of the most rapidly growing and developing cities in the state outside of Chicago. In 1870 its population was a little under 1,500 by 1880 -- seven years before the Muir family arrived -- it had tripled. 

Streator is situated on the banks of the Vermilion river, straddling LaSalle and Livingston counties. The area was first named Hardscrabble because it was a "hard scrabble" to cross the river and get up the hill where the settlement was located. Next the town was called Unionville in honor of the local men who fought in the Civil War. In 1865 the city was named for Worthy Streator, a Cleveland railroad promoter, who financed the region's first mining operation, and the town was incorporated in 1882. 

Bridge over Vermilion River at Streator, Illinois; photograph courtesy
of Encore Editions

Colonel Plumb, Streator's mine overseer, could not afford European employment agents to send him workers. Instead he alerted steamship offices of the new job opportunities and convinced local railroads to carry notices of Streator's promise.  I've always wondered if that's how James Muir came to settle and work in the city.  

Biography in Black included this item from the La Salle Press in 1881:

"N H Deisher of Streator was over here a day or two this week to see his old friends. He says Streator is a booming town and he likes it first rate. We must caution friend D[eisher] to be very careful of himself, for there are lots of holes in the ground over there where people tumble in very frequently and are killed."

The punning La Salle journalist, who meant only to toss a barb in Streator's direction, was right. Streator was booming by the time James Muir's wife, Margaret, and children joined him. Those "holes in the ground" yielded coal and provided jobs for many recent immigrants.

Coal mine in Streator, Illinois; photograph of Mining Artifacts

Biography in Black also contained Edward Steiner's, an immigrant turned professor, description of city. He came to Streator as a young man sometime after 1886. 

"The town lay uninvitingly among the coal mines which gave it life. Its geometric streets contained the usual stores with the invariable surplus of saloons. The residence district stretched in every direction; while at the most undesirable edges of town the miners had settled in hopeless, unkempt groups. These localities were known as prisoners are -- merely by numbers, and were fast deteriorating; for the more stable population of Welsh and German miners was giving way to the changeable, newer, immigrant groups…the [coal] 'patch' seemed to be a law unto itself, as far as cleanliness or even sanitary conditions were concerned. The only time it realized that it was under some government control was when the officers came to interfere in the not infrequent brawls. The miners were entirely out of touch with the community, except through the saloons…"

Such was the nature of the town where Alexander Muir was born.

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'Bridge over Vermilion River at Streator, Illinois,' Encore Editions
'Coal mine in Streator, Illinois,' Mining Artifcats

Saturday, April 23, 2016

Alexander Muir Obituary

As published in the Seattle Daily Times on 7 May 1957:

ALEXANDER MUIR -- Funeral services for Alexander Muir, 68, of 1415 Belmont Av., a retired fireman, will be held at 3 o'clock tomorrow in the Butterworth chapel. Cremation will follow.

Mr. Muir, who was the fire chief at Boeing Airplane Co. during the Second World War, died yesterday of a heart attack.

Mr. Muir was born in Coalville, Ill. He came to Seattle 44 years ago.

Mr. Muir joined the Seattle Fire Department in 1913. He retired in 1920 because of an injury. He rejoined the department in 1930 and served as an inspector until 1935. He retired from Boeing in 1945. He was a member of the Retired Firemen's Association.

Surviving are a son, Alexander E. Muir, Seattle; two daughters, Mrs. Helen M. Potter, Riverside, Calif., and Mrs. Frances Nikas, San Francisco; two sisters, Mrs. Margaret Caswell and Mrs. Jane Beck, both of Danville, Ill., and three grandchildren.

_______________
Seattle Daily Times, 7 May 1957

2.12.10 Alexander Muir (1889-1957)

Alexander Muir was born on 13 May 1889 in Coalville, which was part of Streator, Illinois, to James Muir and Margaret Semple. He was their first child born in the United States and his father was a coal miner. According to the Scottish naming convention, which his parents followed, he should have been named after his father, but was not. His younger sister's given name also did not follow the naming convention so perhaps James and Margaret abandoned it when they immigrated to the U.S.

Alexander's father left the family about 1895 and moved to Iowa. In 1900, Alexander lived with his mother and siblings in Reading, Illinois, where Alexander attended school. When the 1910 census was enumerated he was 21 years old and serving aboard the USS California (ACR-6), which was berthed at the Navy Yard in Mare Island, California. His occupation was listed as Navy musician.

According to his obituary, he moved to Seattle in 1913 and joined the city fire department. However, he returned to the midwest to marry. Alexander married Bertha Isabelle Cloren, daughter of John Patrick Cloren and Janet Ann Milnes, on 13 June 1914 in Adair County, Missouri. The couple had five known children during the course of their marriage though only three lived to adulthood.

When Alexander registered for the World War I on 5 June 1917, his appearance was described as tall and slender with blue-gray eyes and dark brown hair. Twenty-five years later, his appearance was described as 5 feet 9 inches tall and 185 pounds with blue eyes, gray hair, and a ruddy complexion. Both of his little fingers were crooked at the first joint and he had a scar under his left nipple.

Alexander retired from the Seattle Fire Department in 1920 due to an injury and the family moved to Island County, Washington, where their younger children were born.

Alexander's wife Bertha died on 19 October 1929 after a prolonged and difficult childbirth.

He returned to the fire department in 1930 and worked as a fire inspector. He retired again in 1935 and joined Boeing Aircraft Co. at Plant No. 2. as their fire chief. He retired from Boeing in 1945.

Station No. 10, Seattle Fire Department headquarters, 1928; photograph courtesy
of Seattle Fire Department by Richard Schneider

Alexander never remarried and died 6 May 1957. He was dead on arrival when the ambulance arrived at King County Hospital in Seattle. He died of a coronary occlusion and arterio-sclerosis. He was retired from the city fire department at the time of his death and lived at 1415 Belmont Avenue, No. 1. His body was cremated after his death.

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'Station No. 10, Seattle Fire Department Headquarters, 1928,' Seattle Fire Department
1900 US Federal Census, Census Place: Reading, Livingston, Illinois; Roll: 318; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 0114; FHL microfilm: 1240318
1910 US Federal Census, Census Place: USS California, California, Military and Naval Forces; Roll: T624_1784; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 0192; FHL microfilm: 1375797
1920 US Federal Census, Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: T625_1926; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 99; Image: 234
1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: 2494; Page: 15A; Enumeration District: 0044; Image: 350.0; FHL microfilm: 2342228
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Seattle, King, Washington; Roll: T627_379; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 40-174
Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, page 4
Global, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, Memorial No. 114309112
Seattle Daily Times, 7 May 1957
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1915 Seattle, WA (Alex Muir and Bertha Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1916 Seattle, WA (Alex Muir and Bertha Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1917 Seattle, WA (Alex Muir and Bertha I Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1918 Seattle, WA (Alex Muir and Bertha Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1921 Seattle, WA (Alex Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1931 Seattle, WA (A. Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1931 Seattle, WA (Alex Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1932 Seattle, WA (Alex Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1933 Seattle, WA (Alex Muir)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1940 Seattle, WA (Alex Muir)
US, Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002, 1914 Muir, Alexander - Cloren, Bertha
US, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Number: 531-14-1818
US, Washington Deaths, 1883-1960, 1957 Muir, Alexander
US, Washington Death Certificates, 1957, Registrar's No. 2388
US, Washington Select Death Certificates, 1907-1960, 1957 Muir Alexander
US, World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Registration State: Washington; Registration County: King; Roll: 1991887; Draft Board: 1
US, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942, Pacific Alaska Region (Seattle); Seattle, Washington; Fourth Registration Draft Cards (WWII); State Headquarters: Washington; Record Group Name: Records of the Selective Service System; Record Group Number: 147; Archive Number: 563992

Friday, April 22, 2016

Gayle Lynn Hoyt Obituary

As published in the San Diego Union-Tribune on 9 January 2004:

Gayle Lynn Hoyt, 49, of San Diego died Dec. 30. She was born in Detroit and was an agent for the Internal Revenue Service. Survivors include her companion, Susan Furin; mother, Kay Hoyt of Novi, Mich.; sisters, Sandra Nickel of Wixom, Mich., and Kathy Cosentino of Novi, Mich.; brother, Donald Hoyt of Livonia, Mich.; and aunt Merna Hoyt of Livonia, Mich. No services were planned. Donations: blood donations to the San Diego Blood Bank (code GH10) or San Diego MDA, 8525 Gibbs Drive, Suite 304, San Diego, CA 92123. Arrangements: Feathergill Mortuary.

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San Diego Union-Tribune, 9 January 2004

Children of Wilber Walker and Kathryn Mayme (Muir) Hoyt

2.12.9.9.1. Sandra Lee Hoyt (1949- )

Sandra Lee Hoyt was born on 11 September 1949 to Wilber Walker Hoyt and Kathryn "Kay" Mayme Muir. She married Melvin G. Nickel, Jr.  The couple lived in Wixom, Michigan, in 2003 at the time of her sister's death.

2.12.9.9.2. Katherine Ann Hoyt (1951- )

Katherine Ann Hoyt was born on 18 June 1951 to Wilber Walker Hoyt and Kathryn "Kay" Mayme Muir. She married a man by the name of Coentino.  Katherine lived in Novi, Michigan, at the time of her sister's death.

2.12.9.9.3. Donald William Hoyt (1953- )

Donald William Hoyt was born on 13 June 1953 to Wilber Walker Hoyt and Kathryn "Kay" Mayme Muir. He married a woman named Paula and they have at least one son named Peter. The family lived in Livonia, Michigan, in 2003 at the time of his sister's death.

2.12.9.9.4. Gayle Lynn Hoyt (1954-2003)

Gayle Lynn Hoyt was born on 9 October 1954 to Wilber Walker Hoyt and Kathryn "Kay" Mayme Muir. She lived in San Diego with her partner, Susan Furin, when she died on 30 December 2003.

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Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, page 23
Global, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, Memorial No. 8271195
San Diego Union-Tribune, 9 January 2004
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1987 San Diego, CA (Hoyt, Gayle Lynn)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1992 Wixom, MI (Nickel, Sandra L.)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1993 Garden City, MI (Hoyt, Donald W.)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1996 Wixom, MI (Nickel, Sandra L.)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Cosentino, Katherine A. (Novi, MI)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Hoyt, Gayle L. (Detroit, MI)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Hoyt, Gayle L. (San Diego, CA)

2.12.9.9. Wilber Walker Hoyt (1929-1984)

Wilber Walker Hoyt was born on 27 November 1929 in Redford, Michigan, to William Walker Hoyt and Febie Leone Biggs. His family lived at 25529 Hope Street and his father worked as a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service. Ten years later the family lived at 15962 Winston in the same township.

Wilber married Kathryn "Kay" Mayme Muir, daughter of Peter Semple Muir and Mamie Zebio, on 3 December 1948 in Detroit. The couple had four children over the course of their marriage.

Wilber Walker Hoyt died on 9 November 1984 in Farmington Hills, Michigan.

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1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Redford, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: 1076; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 1037; Image: 65.0; FHL microfilm: 2340811
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Redford, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T627_1835; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 82-203
US, Michigan Death Records, 1871-1996, 1984 Hoyt, Wilber W.
US, Michigan Marriage Records, 1867-1952, 1948 Hoyt, Wilber Walker - Muir, Katherine Mayme
US, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, Number: 383-24-9782
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Number: 383-24-9782; Issue State: Michigan; Issue Date: Before 1951

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Kathryn Mayme (Muir) Hoyt Obituary

As published on the Fred Wood Funeral Home website:

Hoyt, Kay age 83. Cherished wife of the late Wilber. Loving mother of Sandi (Bud) Nickel, Kathy (Nick) Cosentino, Don (Belinda) and the late Gayle Hoyt. Proud grandma of Kim, Elizabeth, Sarah, Emma, Jeff, Peter, Greg and great-grandma of Ben, Carson, Carter, Logan, Annabelle, Andrew, Kara and Dallas. Also survived by many other loving family and friends.

Visitation will be held at Fred Wood Funeral Home-Rice Chapel, 36100 Five Mile Road, Livonia (East of Levan) Thursday 2-9 p.m. Funeral Friday at the funeral home, gathering 10 a.m. with service 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to: AB Womens Ministries of Michigan, 3668 Barberry Circle, Wixom, MI 48393-1101.

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Fred Wood Funeral Home, http://www.fredwoodfuneralhome.com

Photograph of Kathryn Mayme (Muir) Hoyt

Kathryn Mayme (Muir) Hoyt; photograph courtesy of Fred
Wood Funeral Home

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Fred Wood Funeral Home, http://www.fredwoodfuneralhome.com

2.12.9.9. Kathryn Mayme Muir (1930-2014)

Kathryn Mayme Muir was born on 13 June 1930 in Adrian, Michigan, to Peter Semple Muir and Mayme Zebio. She was their youngest child. Her father worked as a steam pipe fitter at an auto factory. Sometime between 1935 and 1940, the family moved to 9335 Hubbell Avenue in Detroit, Michigan.

Kathryn, known as Kay, married Wilber Walker Hoyt, son of William Walker Hoyt and Febie Leone Biggs, on 3 December 1948 in Detroit. They had four children over the course of their marriage.

In 1995 Kay and Wilber lived in Novi, Michigan and Kay was still residing there when her daughter died in 2003. Kay died on 4 February 2014.

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1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Detroit, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T627_1888; Page 1B; Enumeration District: 84-1554
Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, pages 19 and 23
Fred Wood Funeral Home, http://www.fredwoodfuneralhome.com
US, Michigan Marriage Records, 1867-1952, 1948 Hoyt, Wilber Walker - Muir, Kathryn Mayme
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1995 Novi, MI (Hoyt, Katherine Mayme)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993, 1950-1993 Hoyt, Katherine M (Wixom, MI)
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Issue State: Michigan; Issue Date: Before 1951 (Hoyt, Katherine)

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Children of Margaret (Muir) Fortgang Rose

2.12.9.8.1. David Lawrence Muir/Rose (c1943- )

David Lawrence Muir was the son of Margaret Muir and was born about 1943 according to my grandmother's genealogy notebook. He was formally or informally adopted by Alvin Rose sometime after Alvin married David's mother. Again, according to the genealogy notebook, David married Patricia Rouleau in August 1965.

2.12.9.8.2. Patricia Rose (after 1950- )

According to my grandmother's genealogy notebook, Patricia Rose was the daughter of Alvin Rose and Margaret Muir.

2.12.9.8.3. Larry Rose (after 1950- )

According to my grandmother's genealogy notebook, Larry Rose was the son of Alvin Rose and Margaret Muir.

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Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, page 22

Alvin and Margaret (Muir) Rose Headstone

Alvin and Margaret (Muir) Rose were interred in Gerrish Township Cemetery in Roscommon, Michigan.

Alvin and Margaret Rose Headstone; photograph courtesy of FAG volunteer
Cathy Taylor

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'Alvin and Margaret Rose Headstone,' Find A Grave

2.12.9.8. Alvin Rose (1918-2002)

Alvin Rose was born on 10 January 1918 in Detroit, Michigan, to Ray Edward Rose and Agnes Duncan. In 1920 the family lived in Southfield, Michigan, where his father farmed on his own account on land he rented. The family remained on the farm for the next 20 years. By 1940 Alvin lived at home with his parents and worked as an inspector at an automobile plant.

He served in the U.S. Army during World War II.

He married Margaret Muir, the daughter of Peter Semple Muir and Mayme Zebio, on 14 January 1950 in Detroit. They had two children and Alvin either formally or informally a son Margaret had prior to their marriage.

They lived in Pleasant Ridge, Michigan, and Alvin work as an inspector for Pontiac Motors and GMAC during the 1950s.

By 1993 Alvin and Margaret had retired to Roscommon, Michigan, where he died on 30 January 2002. Alvin Rose was interred at Gerrish Township Cemetery in Roscommon.

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1920 US Federal Census, Census Place: Southfield, Oakland, Michigan; Roll: T625_790; Page: 7B; Enumeration District: 202; Image: 879
1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Southfield, Oakland, Michigan; Roll: 1019; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 0126; Image: 746.0; FHL microfilm: 2340754
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Southfield, Oakland, Michigan; Roll: T627_1803; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 63-1678
Global, Find A Grave Index, 1600s- Current, Memorial No. 46943965
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1950 Royal Oak, MI (Alvin Rose and Margaret Rose)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1953 Royal Oak, MI (Alvin Rose and Margaret Rose)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1958 Royal Oak, MI (Alvin Rose and Margaret Rose)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1960 Royal Oak, MI (Alvin Rose and Margaret M Rose)
US, Michigan Marriage Records, 1867-1952, 1950 Rose, Alvin - Fortgang, Margaret
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002, 1993-2001 Rose, Alvin (Roscommon, MI)
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002, 2002 Rose, Alvin (Roscommon, MI)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1993 Roscommon, MI (Rose, Alvin)
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Number: 384-10-8908; Issue State: Michigan; Issue Date: Before 1951
US, Veterans Gravesites, 1775-2006, 2002 Rose, Alvin

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

2.12.9.8. Herbert Ralph Fortgang (1918-1985)

Herbert Ralph Fortgang was born on 3 March 1918 in Detroit, Michigan, to Isadore Fortgang and Ruth Henriette Elbinger. Two years later the family lived at 554 Brush Street in Detroit and his father worked as a dairyman at a creamery. The family were Jewish and his father had emigrated from the Austro-Hungarian Empire before his marriage. Herbert's mother was awarded a divorce in 1929 on the grounds of extreme cruelty.

I have been unable to find Herbert Fortgang in the 1930 census, but in 1940 he and his mother and sister lived at 335 Rochester Road. Herbert worked as an assistant manager at a grocery store. In 1941 Herbert attended the Lawrence Technological University as a night pre-junior. He was still a student in 1943 as well as editor-in-chief of the school's yearbook.

Herbert married Margaret Muir on 24 February 1946 in Kentucky. The couple divorced on 17 March 1947 in Wayne County, Michigan. They had no children.

On 6 November 1948 Herbert married Jennie Libby Meisner, daughter of Ben Meisner and Sophie Lewis.

Herbert Ralph Fortgang died on 5 November 1985 in Los Angeles County, California.

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1920 US Federal Census, Census Place: Detroit Ward 1, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T625-803; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 23; Image: 339
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Detroit, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T627_1860; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 84-644
US, California Death Index, 1940-1997, 1985 Fortgang, Herbert
US, Michigan Divorce Index, 1897-1952, 1947 Fortgang, Herbert A. - Fortgang, Margaret
US, Michigan Marriage Records, 1867-1952, 1948 Fortgang, Herbert Ralph - Meisner, Jennie Libby
US, School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, 1941 Lawrence Technological University L-Book, page 45
US, School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, 1943 Lawrence Technological University L-Book, page 30
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Number: 374-05-7371; Issue State: Michigan; Issue Date: Before 1951

2.12.9.8. Margaret Muir (1925-2007)

Margaret Muir was born on 23 November 1925 in Wayne County, Michigan, to Peter Semple Muir and Mayme Zebio. By 1930 the family had moved to Lenawee County, Michigan, where Margaret's father worked as a steam pipe fitter at an automobile company. By 1940 the family lived at 9335 Hubbell Avenue in Detroit.

According to my grandmother, Margaret had a child in 1943 she named David Lawrence Muir.

Margaret married Herbert Ralph Fortgang on 24 February 1946 in Kentucky. Herbert had attended the Lawrence Technological University for at least two years and worked as an assistant manager in a grocery store when the 1940 census was enumerated. Margaret and Herbert divorced on 17 March 1947 in Wayne County, Michigan, and had no children.

On 14 January 1950 Margaret married Alvin Rose in Detroit. Alvin had not been previously married. The couple had two children and Alvin apparently formally or informally adopted David Lawrence Muir, who then used the name Rose.

They lived in Pleasant Ridge, Michigan, and Alvin worked as an inspector for Pontiac Motors and GMAC during the 1950s.

By 1993 Margaret and Alvin retired to Roscommon, Michigan, which is known for its recreational and outdoor activities on the Au Sable river.

Alvin died in 2002 and Margaret died on 24 May 2007 in North Point, Florida, and was interred with her husband at Gerrish Township Cemetery in Roscommon.

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1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Palmyra, Lenawee, Michigan; Roll: 1007; Page: 17B; Enumeration District: 34; Image: 807.0; FHL microfilm: 2340742
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Detroit, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T627_1;888; Page: 18; Enumeration District: 84-1554
Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, pages 19 and 22
Global, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, Memorial No. 46943988
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1950 Royal Oak, MI (Alvin Rose and Margaret Rose)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1953 Royal Oak, MI (Alvin Rose and Margaret Rose)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1958 Royal Oak, MI (Alvin Rose and Margaret Rose)
US, City Directories, 1822-1955, 1960 Royal Oak, MI (Alvin Rose and Margaret M Rose)
US, Michigan Divorce Records, 1897-1952, 1947 Fortgang, Herbert A. - Fortgang, Margaret M.
US, Michigan Find A Grave, 1605-2012, Memorial No. 46943988
US, Michigan Marriage Records, 1867-1952, 1950 Rose, Alvin - Fortgang, Margaret
US, Obituary Collection, 1830-2015, 2007 Rose, Margaret
US, Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current, 2007 Rose, Margaret
US, Public Records Index, Volume I, 1993 Roscommon, MI (Rose, Margaret)
Venice Gondolier, 6 May 2007

Monday, April 18, 2016

Children of Alexander Francis and Bernice Marie (Muir) Samas

2.12.9.7.1. Sharon Anita Samas (unknown- )

Sharon Anita Samas was born on 9 September according to my Grandma Jennings' genealogy notebook, to Alexander Francis Samas and Bernice Marie Muir. However, I do not know the year of her birth or where she was born. My assumption is she is the eldest daughter born before the family moved to Orange County, California, as California is one of the few states that makes recent birth records publicly available.

Sharon married Ronald E. Gifford on 20 June 1970 in Las Vegas, Nevada. They divorced five years later in January 1975 in Los Angeles County, California. I do not know if the couple had children.

Sharon then married George R. Walter on 9 September 1978 in Zephyr Cove, Nevada. I do not know if the couple had children.

2.12.9.7.2. Lynn Marie Samas (1954- )

Lynn Marie Samas was born on 21 October 1954 in Orange, California, to Alexander Francis Samas and Bernice Marie Muir. It is entirely possible she married someone with the surname Zeilenga.

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Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, page 21
US, California Birth Index, 1905-1995, 1954 Samas, Lynn Marie
US, California Divorce Index, 1966-1984, 1975 Gifford, Ronald E - Samas, Sharon A
US, Nevada Marriage Index, 1956-2005, 1970 Gifford, Ronald E - Samas, Sharon A
US, Nevada Marriage Index, 1956-2005, 1978 Walter, George R - Samas, Sharon A
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1993 Garden Grove, CA (Zeilenga, Lynn M)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993, Zeilenga, Lynn M (Garden Grove, CA)

Alexander Francis and Bernice Marie (Muir) Samas Headstone

Alexander Francis and Bernice "Bea" Marie (Muir) Samas were inurned in the Altar Columbarium at the Holy Sepulcher Cemetery in Orange, California.

Alexander Francis and Bernice "Bea" Marie (Muir) Samas; photograph courtesy
of Find A Grave volunteer Laura Hawkings

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'Alexander Francis and Bernice "Bea" Marie (Muir) Samas,' Find A Grave

Sunday, April 17, 2016

Alexander Francis Samas Obituary

As published in the Orange County Register on 18 July 2012:

A loving husband, father and grandfather whose faith guided him through a rewarding life was born into the world Jun 4, 1921...and entered eternal life July 14, 2012.

He was a man of faith, dignity, humor and strength. His love of life was contagious, he brought joy to all he met.

His last big fish landed his picture on a Sport magazine..."86 years young and still sticking the sea bass."

His three "holes in one" made him very proud and someone to respect on the course.

His cooking left everyone asking "what's for dinner"...and, when will you open your own kitchen to the public?" He did in fact cook for the public every day, he delivered his goodies to his loved neighbors, along with a morning joke.

There wasn't a sport he didn't love.

As a young man he grew up in Chicago Heights, studied in the seminary, fought in World War II in the Coast Guard, and was a Golden Glove champion.

He was born of immigrant parents and was raised with ten brothers and sisters. He was proud of his Lithuanian heritage and his family.

He continued to speak that language and support the Lithuanian Catholic Church in Los Angeles throughout his years.

He worked hard his entire life, and had a voice that praised the Lord, his whistle sounded just like the birds.

He was devoted to his wife of 65 years. His love for her was above all! He was the kind of father and grandfather every child should have. He was a good and kind man, yet strong and with unbending character. His love of life, family, and the Lord was an example for all.

He spent his retired years committed to volunteer work at the St. Francis Home in Santa Ana, working to enrich the lives of the Sisters and the residents who meant so much to him.

He was a member of the Elk's Club, the Knights of Columbus, and the President of the St. Francis Guild.

He was a member of the St. Angela Merici parish in Brea for over 30 years and a devout Catholic.

He was a man you could truly lean on and depend on.

He retired as a respected State Farm agent.

He was loved and respected by so many.

He will be missed by all who knew him.

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Orange County Register, 18 July 2012

2.12.9.7. Alexander Francis Samas (1921-2012)

Alexander "Alex" Francis Samas was born on 8 June 1921 in Cook County, Illinois, to Justin Samas and Elizabeth Marie Samas. Both his parents emigrated from Klovainiai, Lithuania, before they married. Perhaps they were related in some way? The year before Alexander was born his father worked as a machinist at a stove company. By 1930 the family, which included at least 10 children, lived in Chicago Heights in a home they owned valued at $3,800. In 1940 they continued to live in Chicago Heights in a home they rented for $26. Alex and a brother contributed to the family income by working as bus boys at a restaurant and their sister worked as a waitress. Alex worked 24 weeks in 1939 and made $230.

Alex joined the Coast Guard during World War II and met Bernice "Bea" Marie Muir at a dance in New York. They married about 1947 and had two daughters.

By 1954 when one of their daughters was born, the family lived in Orange, California. They later moved to Garden Grove and Fullerton, California.

Alex retired as an insurance agent, who worked for State Farm.

He died on 14 July 2012 and was inurned in the Altar Columbarium at Holy Sepulcher Cemetery.

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1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Chicago Heights, Cook, Illinois; Roll: 414; Page: 20B; Enumeration District: 2020; Image: 807.0; FHL microfilm: 2340149
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Chicago Heights, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T627_946; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 103-809
Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, page 21
Global, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, Memorial No. 102535517
Orange County Register, 18 July 2012
US, California Find A Grave Index, 1775-2012, Memorial No. 102535517
US, Illinois Cook County Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922, 1921 Samas, Alexander
US, Obituary Collection, 1930-2015, 2012 Samas, Alexander F
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002, 1997 Samas, Alexander F (Fullerton, CA)
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002, 1998-2002 Samas, Alexander F (Fullerton, CA)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1972 Garden Grove, CA (Alexander F Samas)
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Issue State: Illinois; Issue Date: Before 1951 (Samas, Al F)

Saturday, April 16, 2016

Bernice Marie (Muir) Samas Obituary

Bernice Marie Samas entered this world October 30, 1923. She entered eternal salvation May 18, 2013. She was brave, courageous and beautiful.

She was raised in Dearborn, Michigan with 5 brothers and sisters on a farm where she loved to pick the fresh fruit and vegetables and enjoy her mother's freshly baked bread almost daily. She learned all things food, cooking and canning and how to make naked vegetables a treat.

Bea was a very talented woman. If you were lucky enough to have something handmade by her, you were spoiled and learned about quality and details. If you played tennis or golf as an opponent, you had quite a challenge, and her quick bright mind never failed her, right up to her final breaths.

She joined the army and was a surgical nurse in WWII. Her precision and capabilities made her a favorite and requested assistant in surgery. This would have been a perfect fit for a career as it married her kind heart with skillful precision/never error ways.

Instead, she married her husband of 65 years, who preceded her in death by 10 months. She was his all, and he was hers. They met on a dance floor in New York during the war. She was the belle of the ball, and Alex knew if he didn't learn to dance, he would have to watch her dance with others. Theirs was a love story of devotion to The Lord, each other, their family, and any in need. Bea was devoted to the St. Francis Retirement home to enrich the lives of the Sisters and the residents.

Bea Samas was sweet, kind, bright, and a consummate lady. She was admired and loved by all who knew her. Bea was a most loving mother to 2 daughters and 4 grandchildren and many wonderful friends and extended family. She will be greatly missed.

Hers was a selfless love story, and now, one lovebird has flown to join the other. She surely dances with her husband and rests in the peace of The Lord.

A recitation of the Rosary will take place Wednesday, May 29th at 7:00 p.m. and her Funeral Mass will be celebrated Thursday, May 30th at 10:00 a.m. Both services will be at the St. Frances Retirement Home, 1718 W. 6th St., Santa Ana, CA 92703. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations be made to St. Francis Home.

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Bernice "Bea" Marie (Muir) Samas, Obituary, http://www.LocalTributes.com

2.12.9.7. Bernice Marie Muir (1923-2013)

Bernice "Bea" Marie Muir was born on 30 October 1923 in Michigan, likely on her parents' farm in Dearborn, to Peter Semple Muir and Mayme Zebio. By 1930 the family lived in Lenawee County, Michigan where Bea's father worked as a steam pipe fitter at an automobile factory. By 1940 the family had moved to 9335 Hubbell Avenue in Detroit. On 9 November 1944 Bea followed her sister Betty into the Women's Army Corps where she served as a practical nurse and surgerical assistant.

She met Alexander "Alex" Francis Samas, son of Justin and Elizabeth Marie (Samas) Samas in New York during the war and they married about 1947. The couple had two daughters.

By 1954 the family had moved to Orange County, California. In 1993 they lived at 533 Riviera Court in Fullerton.

Bernice "Bea" Marie (Muir) Samas; courtesy of
LocalTributes.com

Bea lost her husband in 2012 and she died 10 months later on 18 May 2013 in Fullerton, California. She and Alex were inurned in the Altar Columbarium at the Holy Sepulcher Cemetery in Orange, California.

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'Bernice "Bea" Marie (Muir) Samas,' LocalTributes.com
1930 US Federal Census, Census Place, Palmyra, Lenawee, Michigan; Roll: 1007; Page: 17B; Enumeration District: 34; Image: 807.0; FHL microfilm; 2340742
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place, Detroit, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T627_1888; Page 1B; Enumeration District: 84-1554
Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, pages 19 and 21
Bernice Marie Samas Obituary, http://www.LocalTributes.com
Global, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, Memorial No. 111206284
US, Obituary Collection, 1930-2015, 2013 Samas, Bernice
US, Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current, 2013 Samas, Bernice
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1992 Fullerton, CA (Samas, Bernice M)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1993 Fullerton, CA (Samas, Bernice M)
US, World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946, 1944 Muir, Bernice M

Friday, April 15, 2016

2.12.9.6.1. Caryle Elizabeth Telek (1949- )

Caryle Elizabeth Telek was born on 16 June 1949, likely in Michigan, to Andy Simon Telek and Elizabeth "Betty" May Muir. She was their only child. When she was a girl, her father worked for National Life & Accident Insurance Co. as an agent and the family lived in Birmingham, Michigan, where Caryle attended Derby Junior High School.

According to Grandma Jennings' genealogy notebook, Caryle married Dennis Arthur Lzcgesny on 18 April 1970. I have been unable to find any trace of him or whether the couple had children.

Caryle then married David L. Rubbelke likely between 1983 and 1988. They had at least one child. When Caryle's Mom died in 2009, the Rubbelke family lived in Rochester Hills, Michigan.

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Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, page 21
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1983 Royal Oak, MI (Caryle Telek)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1988 Royal Oak, MI (Carol E Rubbelke)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1993 Rochester Hills, MI (Caryle E Rubbelke)
US, School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, 1963 Derby Junior High School Cycle, page 41

Andy Simon and Elizabeth May (Muir) Telek Headstone

Andy Simon and Elizabeth "Betty" May (Muir) Telek were interred at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell, Florida:

Andy S. and Betty M. Telek Headstone; Find A Grave volunteer jeff gullickson

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'Andy S. and Betty M. Telek Headstone,' Find A Grave

2.12.9.6. Andy Simon Telek (1915-1999)

Andy Simon Telek was born on 19 June 1915 in Sullivan County, Indiana, to Simon Telek and Mary Lakatos. His parents had immigrated separately from the Austro-Hungarian Empire and married in Indiana. In 1920 the family lived in Blacklick, Pennsylvania, where Andy's father worked as a coal miner. By 1930 the family had moved to 17331 Dequindre Street in Detroit and Andy's father was a laborer in an automobile factory. Andy attended the High School of Commerce in 1931 as a sophomore. Andy was listed as an outstanding member of the class for his baseball prowess as a left fielder.

1931 High School of Commerce baseball team. Andy Telek is in the front row
second from the right; photograph courtesy of Ancestry.com

When the 1940 census was enumerated, Andy was 24 years old. No occupation was listed for him but he had worked for 15 weeks in 1939 and made $500. He was drafted on 14 April 1941 and became one of the first young men drafted under the new Selective Service and Training Act of 1940. He was discharged on 7 December 1945 as a staff sergeant.

He married Elizabeth "Betty" May Muir on 28 September 1946 in Detroit. The couple had one daughter. By 1954 the family lived in Birmingham, Michigan and Andy worked as an agent for National Life & Accident Insurance Co. in Highland Park, Michigan.

Andy and Betty moved to Florida in 1981 after Andy retired. Andy died on 2 February 1999 in Sun City Center, Florida. He was interred at the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell, Florida.

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'1931 High School of Commerce Baseball Team,' Ancestry.com
1920 US Federal Census, Census Place: Blacklick, Cambria, Pennsylvania; Roll: T625_1545; Page: 16A; Enumeration District: 139; Image: 324
1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Detroit, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: 1042; Page: 16A: Enumeration District: 0276; Image: 231.0; FHL microfilm: 2340777
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Detroit, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T627_1855; Page: 19A; Enumeration District: 84-478
Alice (Muir) Genealogy Notebook, page 21
Global, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, Memorial No. 1245151
Tampa Tribune, 3 February 1999
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1954 Birmingham, MI (Andy S and Betty Telek)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1956 Birmingham, MI (Andy S and Elizabeth M Telek)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1960 Birmingham, MI (Andy S and Elizabeth M Telek)
US, Michigan Marriage Records, 1867-1952, 1946 Telek, Andy S - Muir, Elizabeth May
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002, 1994-2002 Telek, Andy S (Sun City Center, FL)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1993 Ruskin, FL (Andy S Telek)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Telek, Andrew S (Sun City Center, FL)
US, School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, 1931 High School of Commerce Reveille, pages 93 and 126
US, Veterans Gravesites, 1775-2006, 1999 Telek, Andy S (Florida National Cemetery)
US, World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946, 1941 Telek, Andy S

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Army Women's Corps (WACs) in World War II

"Their contributions in efficiency, skill, spirit and determination are immeasurable."
-- Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower

Over 150,000 women served in the Women's Army Corps during World War II, making the equivalent of seven divisions of men available for combat. Applicants had to be between 21 and 45 years of age with no dependents, be at least five feet tall, and weigh 100 pounds or more. The first WACs joined Aircraft Warning Service (AWS) units in the field. Later recruits were sent to the Army Air Forces (AAF), Army Ground Forces (AGF), or Army Services Force (ASF) where they worked as file clerks, typists, stenographers, or motor pool drivers. Gradually each service discovered women were capable of filling numerous positions, such as weather observers and forecasters, cryptographers, radio operators and repairmen, sheet metal workers, parachute riggers, bombsight maintenance specialists, aerial photography analysts, and control tower operators. Some were even assigned flying duties and others ran the statistical control machines (precursors of computers) used to keep track of personnel records.

Soon after Betty Muir enlisted in the WACs as an aviation cadet, recruiting slowed to a trickle as slander campaigns challenged the WACS as sexually immoral. Many soldiers ferociously opposed allowing women in uniform, warning their sisters and female friends they would be seen as lesbians or prostitutes. Other men, seeing the posters that called on women to volunteer in order to "free a man to fight" feared being sent to combat units if women took the safe jobs. Critics outside the military included those with religious objections, reactionaries who wanted to prevent social change, and right-wing critics of Roosevelt's social programs.

Women's Army Auxiliary Corps recruiting poster; photograph courtesy of Wikipedia

Despite initial resistance, the WACs were considered important by many in the Army, who realized they helped the U.S. and its allies win the war. Traditional restrictions placed on women in the workplace before the war were broken by World War II. The WACs were disbanded in 1978 and all-female units were integrated with male units.

General Douglas McArthur called the WACs "my best soldiers," adding that they worked harder, complained less, and were better disciplined than men.

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Treadwell, Mattie E. United States Army in World War II: Special Studies -- The Women's Army Corps, (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1954)
U.S. Army Center for Military History, http://www.history.army.mil

Elizabeth May (Muir) Telek Easton Obituary

Elizabeth May Telek/Easton of 1922 Eastview Drive, Sun City Center, FL, known to all as Betty, died on Saturday, Jan. 17 2009, in Rochester Hills, Michigan. She had recently moved to Michigan due to her illness.

Betty was born May 17, 1921 in Dearborn, Michigan, to Peter and Mamie Muir. She grew up on a farm and attended school in Adrian, Michigan. Betty was a World War II veteran and proudly served in the WAACs. She married Andy Telek on Sept. 19, 1946 and lived in Birmingham and Warren, Michigan until moving to Sun City Center in 1981.

Betty loved golfing, dancing and crafts and spent many happy hours in those activities. She was a wonderful lady and was loved by all. Her family and friends will miss her sorely.

She is survived by her daughter, Caryle (and son in law, David) Rubbelke; two sisters, Kay Hoyt and Bea Samas; three grandchildren and four great grandchildren.

A memorial service and burial with honors will be held at 11am on Friday June 26, 2009 at the Florida National Cemetery, 6502 SW 102nd Avenue, Bushnell, FL 33513, (352) 793-7740. If interested in attending, please contact Caryle Rubbelke - 2485 Norton Lawn, Rochester Hills, Michigan 48307, (248) 852-3138 for information.

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Tampa Tribune, 30 January 2009

2.12.9.6. Elizabeth May Muir (1921-2009)

Elizabeth "Betty" May Muir was born on 17 May 1921 in Dearborn, Michigan, to Peter Semple Muir and Mayme Zebio. She was their sixth child, though two had died as infants earlier. Her older sister, Irene died the year after Elizabeth was born. By 1930 the family lived in Palmyra Township, Michigan, where Betty's father worked as a steam fitter at an auto factory. Sometime between 1935 and 1940 the family moved to 9335 Hubbell Avenue in Detroit.

At the age of 21, Betty enlisted in the Women's Army Corps on 28 August 1942 and become an aviation cadet. She married Andy Simon Telek, son of Simon Telek and Mary Lakatos, on 28 September 1946 in Detroit, the year before Betty's father died. They had one child.

By 1954 Andy and Betty lived in Birmingham, Michigan, on 1967 Hazel Street. Andy worked as an insurance agent. They moved to the Tampa area of Florida in 1981 where they lived in Sun City.

Elizabeth "Betty" May (Muir) Telek; Tampa Tribune

Andy died in 1999 and some time, likely after 2001, Betty married a Mr. Easton. After she became fatally ill, she moved to Rochester Hills, Michigan, to be near her daughter. She died there on 17 January 2009. She was interred with her first husband at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell, Florida.

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'Elizabeth "Betty" May (Muir) Telek,' Tampa Tribune
1930 US Federal Census, Census Place: Palmyra, Lenawee, Michigan; Roll: 1007; Page: 17B; Enumeration District: 34; Image: 807.0; FHL microfilm: 2340742
1940 US Federal Census, Census Place: Dearborn, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T627_1826; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 82-30
Alice (Muir) Jennings Genealogy Notebook, pages 19 and 21
Global, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, Memorial No. 115819727
Tampa Tribune, 30 January 2009
US, Cemetery and Funeral Home Collection, 1847-2015, 2009 Telek Easton, Elizabeth
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1954 Birmingham, MI (Andy S and Betty Telek)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1956 Birmingham, MI (Andy S and Betty Telek)
US, City Directories, 1822-1995, 1960 Birmingham, MI (Andy S and Betty Telek)
US, Florida Find A Grave Index, 1800-2012, Memorial No. 115818727
US, Michigan Marriage Records, 1867-1952, 1946 Telek, Andy S - Muir, Elizabeth May
US, Obituary Collection, 1930-2015, 2009 Telek Easton, Elizabeth May
US, Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current, 2009 Easton, Elizabeth May (Muir) (Telek)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1993 Ruskin, FL (Elizabeth M Telek)
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, Issue State: Michigan; Issue Date: Before 1951 (Easton, Elizabeth M)
US, World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946, 1942 Muir, Elizabeth M

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Children of Harold Muir and Marian Ruth Ternes

12.9.5.1. Randall Peter Muir (1950- )

Randall Peter Muir was born on 2 November 1950, likely in Michigan, to Harold Muir and Marian Ruth Ternes. The family moved to California when he was three years old. Randall married Mary Louise Lansford on 25 June 1971 in Orange County, California. Mary Louise was born on 10 November 1950 in Los Angeles County, California. According to his father's obituary, he lived in Claremont, California, in 2003.

The couple have two children:

12.9.5.1.1. Joseph Michael Muir (1976- )

Joseph Michael Muir was born on 1 December 1976. On 22 July 2000 he married Christi Lynn Major, daughter of John Guy Major and Deborah Ann McKinney, in Tarrant County, Texas. She was born on 24 January 1975 and may have been married previously.

Joseph Michael Muir married Hannah Sharene Penn on 15 June 2008 in Multnomah County, Oregon.

12.9.5.1.2. Sonja Louise Muir (1977- )

Sonja Louise Muir was born on 22 December 1977 in San Diego, California.

12.9.5.2. Richard Thomas Muir (1952- )

Richard Thomas Muir was born on 15 February 1952, likely in Michigan, to Harold Muir and Marian Ruth Ternes. The family moved to California when he was a year old. He married Teddi Jeanne McGee on 29 May 1977 in San Diego County. She was born on 17 July 1951. According to his father's obituary he resided in Oceanside, California, in 2003. I do not know if the couple have children.

12.9.5.3. Mary Lynn Muir (1955- )

Mary Lynn Muir was born on 15 February 1955 in Los Angeles County to Harold Muir and Marian Ruth Ternes. According to her father's obituary, she lived in Santa Monica, California, in 2003.

12.9.5.4. Robert Michael Muir (1958- )

Robert Michael Muir was born on 29 November 1958 in Los Angeles County to Harold Muir and Marian Ruth Ternes. According to his father's obituary, he lived in Elk Grove, California, in 2003.

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US, California Birth Index, 1905-1995, 1950 Lansford, Mary Louise
US, California Birth Index, 1905-1995, 1951 McGee, Teddi Jeanne
US, California Birth Index, 1905-1995, 1955 Muir, Mary Lynn
US, California Birth Index, 1905-1995, 1958 Muir, Robert M
US, California Marriage Index, 1960-1985, 1971 Muir, Randall P - Lansford, Mary L
US, California Marriage Index, 1960-1985 1977 Muir, Richard T - McGee, Teddie J
US, Oregon Marriage Indexes, 1906-1924, 1946-2008, 2008 Muir, Joseph Michael
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2000, 1995-1997 Muir, Richard (Shingle Springs, CA)
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002, 1998-2002 Muir, Mary L (Santa Monica, CA)
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002, 2000-2001 Muir, Mary L (Santa Monica, CA)
US, Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002, 2000-2001 Muir, Randall (Claremont, CA)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1981 Los Angeles, CA (Muir, Mary L)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1990 Escondido, CA (Muir, Robert M)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1994 Watauga, TX (Major, Christi)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1996 Escondido, CA (Muir, Richard T)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1996 Escondido, CA (Muir, Teddie J)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1996 Upland, CA (Muir, Joseph M)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 1, 1996 Upland, CA (Muir, Mary L)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Major, Christi L (Fort Worth, TX)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Major, Christi (Hurst, TX)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Muir, Joseph M (Pomona, CA)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Muir, Mary L (Jackson, CA)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Muir, Mary L (Rancho Cucamonga, CA)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Muir, Mary L (Santa Monica, CA)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Muir, Randall P (Upland, CA)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Muir, Richard T (Oceanside, CA)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Muir, Robert (Escondido, CA)
US, Public Records Index, Volume 2, 1950-1993 Muir, Teddie J (Cameron Park, CA)
US, Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997, 1975 Major, Christi Lynn
US, Texas Divorce Index, 1968-2011, 1998 Williams Christopher D - Williams, Christi L
US, Texas Marriage Collection, 1814-1909 and 1966-2011, 2000 Muir, Joseph M - Major, Christi L