Saturday, January 31, 2015

Why Belfast?

We know that Annie (Cowie) Riddell and at least some of her children lived in Belfast, Northern Ireland, or visited her while she lived at 10 Parkend Street:
  • Isabella Cowie Riddell married John Davidson Forman there in 1920
  • Annie Riddell returned from Canada and lived there with her mother for 10 months in 1920-1921
  • John Riddell was living and working there when he immigrated to Canada in 1923
  • Annie (Cowie) Riddell was living there when she immigrated to Canada in 1924
However, there is no evidence that Annie's husband, Oswald Dykes Riddell, ever joined her in Belfast or that they two lived together again as a married couple. And we don't know why anyone in the family decided to go to Belfast at that time.

Entrance to Belfast Harbor circa in the early 1900s; image courtesy of
Old UK Photos

The Government of Ireland Act of 1920 partitioned the country into two separate jurisdictions. The Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 allowed Northern Ireland to opt out of the newly established Irish Free State, which it did in 1922. The changes were not bloodless. A total of 557 people were killed between 1920 and 1922 in sectarian violence. Between 1919 and 1921 the Irish Republican Army and British security forces fought the War of Irish Independence followed by the Irish Civil War from 1922 to 1923.

The history of legal actions, war, and revolution is a convoluted and torturous one. Why would anyone choose to live in Belfast at the time of such unrest?

2.3.3.6 John Riddell (1893-unknown)

John Riddell was born on 8 August 1893 at the family home at 48 St. John Street in Coatbridge. He was Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell's sixth child and only son.  He may have been in the Fever Hospital in Coatbridge along with his sister Henrietta when the 1901 census was taken. The little boy is the correct age and born in the correct place but the last name looks more like Ridden or Riddon so I am not sure.

In 1911 he was 18 years old and lived with his family in Coatbridge at 5 Academy street. He worked in the family restaurant as a waiter.

On 22 February 1916 John Riddell married Mary Forsyth at her home on 70 High Street in Dunfermline. John sold spirits and Mary was a 23-year-old drapery saleswoman. John was a private in the 2/6th Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry. It was a territorial force battalion, which was renamed the 22nd Battalion around the time of John's marriage.

In March, the month following his marriage, John moved to Maldon and then to Curragh, Ireland, in January 1917. Later the battalion moved to Dublin and back to Curragh in November 1917. It was disbanded in May 1918. John and Mary had at least two sons in Scotland.

By 1923 John was living in Belfast, Northern Ireland and working as a bar man. On 7 April he boarded the Canadian Pacific Railway's S/S Marburn and traveled 3rd class bound for Canada. He arrived on 13 April, landing at St. John's, New Brunswick. He told Canadian officials he was single, intended to settle in Canada and was headed to his sister, Annie Riddell's home at 746 De L'epee Avenue in Montreal.

Canadian Pacific Line's S/S Marburn; image courtesy of Del Campe

That is the last record I can find for John Riddell. Mary (Forsyth) Riddell's died in Dunfermline in 1970. Her surname at the time of her death was Riddell, so I assume she never remarried.

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1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Riddell Oswald (Census 1901 652/02 027/00 014)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 27; Page 14; Line: 22; Roll: CSSCT1901_348
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Riddell Oswald Dykes (Census 1911 652/02 033/00 012)
Canada, Ocean Arrivals (Form 30A), 1919-1924, Rolls: T-14939 - T-15248, 1923 Riddell, John
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1893 Riddell, John (Statutory Birth 652/02 0955)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1916 Riddell, John - Mary, Forsyth (Statutory Marriages 424/00 0063)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Class: BT26, 1923 Riddell, John

Friday, January 30, 2015

2.3.3.5. Arthur MacDonald Smith (1887-1965)

Arthur MacDonald Smith was born on 21 October 1887 at his parents home at 66 Stirling Street in Airdrie, Scotland. His parents were James Smith, who owned a foundry business in Airdrie, and Eleanor Nevin. Arthur lived with his parents at that address through the 1911 census. At that time Arthur worked as an electrical engineer, likely for his father. He had three older brothers, who were mechanical engineers.

Arthur married Janet Cowie Riddell on 26 June 1914 at the Masonic Hall on Bank Street in Coatbridge. He was still working as an electrical engineer and lived on Victoria Place in Airdrie.

It is not known if Arthur and Janet had children.

Arthur died on 16 August 1965 at the Coathill Hospital in Coatbridge of myocardial infarction, arteriosclerosis, and broncho pneumonia. He was retired at the time of his death and lived with his wife, Janet, at 14 Bellsdyke Road in Airdrie. His widow died four years later.

_______________
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Airdrie; ED: 17; Page: 17; Line: 7; Roll: CSSCT1891_313
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: New Monkland; ED: 15; Page: 24; Line: 13; Roll: CSSCT1901_342
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Smith, Arthur McD (Census 1911 651/00 014/00 012)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1887 Smith, Arthur MacDonal (Statutory Births 651/01 0918
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1914 Smith, Arthur McDonald - Riddell, Janet Cowie (Statutory Marriages 652/02/0132)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, Extract of an entry from the Register of Deaths in Scotland, 1965, Smith, Arthur MacDonald

2.3.3.5. Janet Cowie Riddell (1891-1969)

Janet Cowie Riddell was born on 29 August 1891 at 48 St. John Street in Coatbridge, Scotland. She was the fifth child of Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell. Her father worked as a coachman at the time.

When the 1901 census was enumerated the family lived at 18 Baird Street in Coatbridge. In 1911 Janet was working as a general servant in the home of Dr. Paul Stewart, a medical practitioner in the Govan area of Glasgow. His home was located on 6 Bellahouston Terrace.

Janet married Arthur MacDonald Smith on 26 June 1914 at the Masonic Hall on Bank Street in Coatbridge. She was living with her parents at 5 Academy Street in the same town at the time of her marriage. Arthur was an electrical engineer and lived on Victoria Place in Airdrie.

It is not known if Arthur and Janet had children.

Arthur died in in 1965 and Janet died on 3 April 1969 at Strathclyde Hospital in Motherwell of congestive heart failure and chronic bronchitis. Her usual residence was 14 Bellsdyke Road in Airdrie.

Of the seven children of Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell only Janet and Isabella did not immigrate to Canada. No definitive information about Janet's sister, Martha Muir Riddell, is known beyond 1911 but she likely didn't immigrate.

_____________
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Riddell, Oswald (Census 1901 652/02 027/00 014)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 27; Page: 14; Line: 21; Roll: CSSCT1901_348
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Riddell, Janet C (Census 1911 646/02 006/0A 002)
Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950, 1893 Riddell, Janet Cowie
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1981 Riddell, Janet Cowie (Statutory Births 652/02 0951)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1914 Smith, Arthur McDonald - Riddell, Janet Cowie (Statutory Marriages 652/02 0132)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, Extract of an entry from the Register of Deaths in Scotland 6512766CE

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Adoption in Scotland

Adoptions in Scotland at the time John and Henrietta Rennie adopted Samuel Dunn were informal affairs up until 1930. The Adoption of Children (Scotland) Act of 1930 introduced legal adoption. Since then adoptions are typically arranged by charitable organizations or the social work departments of local authorities.

Before 1930 adoptions were arranged on a private basis, between individuals or charitable organizations. We do not know how Samuel Dunn came to John and Henrietta Rennie. Were his parents friends? Did the Rennies work though a charity?

2.3.3.4.1. Samuel Dunn (1920- )

Samuel Dunn was the adopted son of John and Henrietta (Riddell) Rennie. His biological parents were Samuel and Jane (McPhail) Dunn. Samuel was 42 years old at the time of the marriage and Jane was 25, however, neither had been married previously. They were married on 6 February 1920 at Coatbridge, Scotland. Samuel Dunn died on 21 April 1920, just two months after his marriage, at the County Hospital in Ayr of a perforated duodenal ulcer.

Samuel's son, also named Samuel after his paternal grandfather and father, was born 7 months after his father's death on 22 November 1920 at 18 Southpaw in Summerlee, which was in the Coatbridge District.

Some time before 30 April 1927, John and Henrietta (Riddell) Rennie adopted young Samuel. On that date the family boarded the White Star Line's RMS Regina to immigrate to Canada. They arrived in Quebec on 7 May 1927 and their intended destination was Montreal, to the home of Henrietta's mother, Annie (Cowie) Riddell.

No other record for Samuel Dunn or Samuel Rennie has been found.

_______________
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Microfilm Publications T-479 to T-520, T-4689 to T4874, T-14700 to T-14939, C-4511 to C-4542
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1920 Dunn Samuel (Statutory Deaths 578/01 0173)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1920 Dunn Samuel - McPhail, Jane (Statutory Marriages 652/02 0057)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, Extract of an entry from the Register of Births in Scotland (1920, Dunne, Samuel)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, 1927, Rennie, Henrietta

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

2.3.3.4. John Rennie (1886-unknown)

John Rennie was born on 6 March 1886 at his parents home on 746 Gartsherrie in the middle district of Old Monkland. His parents were John and Jane (Kerr) Rennie. His father was a journeyman boiler maker at the time of his birth. In 1891 the family lived on 5 Lockhart Place in Coatbridge.

John's mother died in 1899 and his father must have parceled out the children as John was a visitor in the home of William and Agnes Lester in Coatbridge. John was 15 years old and worked as a general laborer. His father boarded with another family and none of the other children were living with him.

John's father died in 1908. In 1911 he was a boarder in the home of John and Agnes Douglas. The family lived in Coatbridge and John worked as a striker at a tube manufacturer.

He married Henrietta (Riddell) Dick on 31 Dec 1919 at Monkland View in Airdrie, Scotland according to the forms of the United Free Church of Scotland. Henrietta was a young widow who had lost her first husband, Oswald Dykes Riddell Dick, in 1918. He served with the British Army and had been killed in action in France. He had left her with four young step-children. The British Army paid Henrietta a little over 17 pounds in 1919.

On 30 April 1927 John, Henrietta, and an adopted son, named Samuel Dunn, boarded the White Star Line's RMS Regina in Grennock to immigrate to Canada. They arrived in Quebec on 7 May 1927. Their destination was Henrietta's mother's home on 2762 St. Catherine Street in Montreal.

In 1957 John and Henrietta were living at 523 Rue Ville-Marie in Montreal.

That is the last record I have been able to find for John Rennie. No trace of Oswald Dykes Riddell Dick's children by his first marriage have been found.

_________________
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 26; Page: 26; Line: 20; Roll: CSSCT1891_319
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Rennie, John (Census 652/02 032/00 017)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 32; Page: 17; Line: 9; Roll: CSSCT1901_348
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Rennie, John (Census 1911 652/02 021/00 002)
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, 1927 Rennie, John
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1957 Rennie, John
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1886 Rennie, John (Statutory Births 652/02 0231)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1920 Rennie, John - Dick, Henrietta (Statutory Marriages 651/00 0029)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, 1927 Rennie, John

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Terlincthun British Cemetery

Lance Corporal Oswald Dykes Riddell was killed in action during the counter attack at Champagne. His final burial location is plot XVI AA 25 at the Terlincthun British Cemetery in Wimville, Pas-de-Calais, France.

He was originally buried at the Epernay French National Cemetery. His body was exhumed and reinterred in July 1964.

According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission the first rest camps for British Commonwealth forces were established near Terlincthun in August 1914. Numerous hospitals and other medical establishments were located nearby. The cemetery was begun in Jun 1918. It was used chiefly for burials from base hospitals.

Terlincthun British Cemetery; photograph courtesy of the
Commonwealth War Graves Commission

The cemetery is located a few hundred meters from the Column of the Grande Armee and the statue of Napoleon looking longingly at an un conquered Britain. It is designed so it gives the impression that the former French Emperor is watching over the graves of British Commonwealth soldiers buried there.

The optical illusion works best from behind the Stone of Remembrance and was the idea of British architect Sir Herbert Baker, who designed the cemetery in June 1918.

_______________
"Terlincthun British Cemetery," Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Terlincthun British Cemetery
Remembrance Trails, Terlincthun British Cemetery

Killed In Action during the British Counter-attack at Champagne

Oswald Dykes Riddell Dick served as a Lance Corporal with the 152nd Brigade of the 51st (Highland) Division. He regiment was known as the 1/5 Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders. During the night of 18-19 July the division troops were in action near Epernay, Champagne, France.

Oswald Dykes Riddell Dick was killed in action during the counter-attack at Champagne on 21 July 1918. That day's fighting was described by Major F. W. Bewsher in his book about the 51st (Highland) Division in World War I:

"It was arranged that the 152nd Infantry Brigade should take over the 153rd Brigade front and carry out a second attack. The general plan was that the brigade should advance on a one battalion front, the 5th Seaforth Highlanders leading, the 6th Gordon Highlanders next, and the 6th Seaforth Highlanders in the rear. Three objectives were selected for the attack, the first being the northwest edge of Bois de Coutron, the second the southern slopes of the Bois de Eclipses, and the third the northern slopes.

The 153rd Brigade were to form such defensive flanks as became necessary during the progress of the attack, the 7th Gordon Highlanders on the right and the 7th Black Watch on the left. On the right of the Highland Division the 62nd Division were to attack with a view to encircling the Marfaux locality from the north while the 9th French Division were attacking on the left, the village of Paradis being the particular stumbling-block in their path which they hoped to remove.


Disposition of the 52nd (Highland) Division troops at the beginning of
the Counter-attack at Campagne; map on page 330 of the division
history written by Major Brewsher

The artillery barrage fell, as had been planned, south of Les Haies-La Neuville road; but as the enemy had closely followed our troops during their last withdrawal, he had been able to establish many machine gun posts close to the jumping-off line. The result was that the barrage fell behind the enemy's foremost troops, and the machine guns of his outposts were untouched.

In consequence, the 6th Gordon Highlanders met with the stoutest opposition from the outset of the attack, a storm of bullets greeting them as soon as their advance began. Nevertheless, the troops on the right, with fine determination, brushed back all resistance supported numerous and well-sited machine guns and trench mortars. 

In spite of many gallant attempts made by the battalion to carry this line, it held firm, the Germans defending themselves skillfully and courageously with rifles and hand grenades. For an hour the 6th Gordon Highlanders tried to come to close grips with them, and drive them from their position, but without results.


Champagne, France battlefield in 1918; photograph courtesy of
GreatWarPhotos.com

Meanwhile the enemy displayed on his part the greatest initiative, making repeated attempts to filter through gaps in our front line and on the right flank, and ultimately became so threatening on the right rear of the 6th Gordon Highlanders that they were compelled to fall back to on that flank to a position some 200 yards in advance of their jumping-off line.

On the left the advance was held up after the wood had been cleared for some 500 yards. Paradis had successfully withstood the repeated attempts of the French to storm it, so that the left flank of the Division's attack was again in the air. In consequence leading troops in this part of the battlefield also fell back onto the same line as the right flank had done, the 7th Black Watch forming a defensive flank to connect the left of the 6th Gordon Highlanders with the right of the French.

A company of the 5th Seaforth Highlanders was also sent forward to fill gaps that had occurred in the center of the 6th Gordon Highlanders line. 

As had been the case on the previous day, the difficulties of the operation were greatly increased by the blindness of the country, it being almost impossible to locate exactly the positions and flanks of the advance parties in the wood.

However, by noon a continuous line had been formed joining the left of the 154th Brigade to the right of the French. 

The troops were closely engaged throughout the day, and it became necessary to move forward companies from all three battalion of the 152nd Brigade to strengthen the line in places where it was becoming weakened. On the left the successful resistance of the Germans in Paradis had made it necessary to occupy a line which curved round the eastern side of that village some 300 yards from it, while on the right flank the 6th Seaforth Highlanders, after some fighting with enemy machine guns, established themselves on a line facing north some 700 yards south of Espilly.

So ended another day of severe fighting. The 152nd Brigade had taken over the whole of the front on the left, the 5th and 6th Seaforth Highlanders having been employed, either in strengthening the line held by the 6th Gordon Highlanders, or in protecting their flanks.

The day's operations ended with 81 prisoners with a number of machine guns and trench mortars captured." 

On 21 July 1918, the day Oswald Dick was killed, the British Corps commander sent the following message to the commander of the 51st (Highland) Division:

"The Corps commander wishes to convey to all the ranks of your division his appreciation of the great work that has been done during the past two days' fighting.

The French Army commander told me today that he was entirely satisfied with the result and the good bag of prisoners obtained in the face of the most obstinate resistance by picked troops of the enemy, who are under special orders to hold the front in order to allow for the safe retreat of the German troops beaten and driven back by the French across the Marne and on the Soissons front. 

Tactically, strategically and politically the gallant fighting of your division may have far-reaching results."

_______________

Bewsher, F. W., The History of the 51st (Highland) Division, (Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1921), pages 321-355
"Champagne, France, battlefield, 1918", Great War Photos
Regiments, Long, Long Trail, http://www.1914-1918.net

Monday, January 26, 2015

2.3.3.4. Oswald Dykes Riddell Dick (1888-1918)

Oswald Dykes Riddell Dick was born on 7 October 1888 at 12 Ferrie Street in the Maryhill area of Glasgow to James Dick, a blacksmith, and Helen Cowie, his housekeeper. Oswald was named after his uncle, Oswald Dykes Riddell, Helen Cowie's sister's husband. James Dick and Helen Cowie had nine children together but did not marry until 1903.

The family was listed at various addresses in the 1891 and 1901 census. On 21 Feb 1906 Oswald signed his attestation form for military service with the British Army. He was assigned to the Royal Army Medical Corps. He was living at 182 Church Street in Glasgow, was a blacksmith, had never served in the military before or been in prison. At the time of his enlistment he was described as being 5 feet 3 inches tall and weighed 101 pounds. He had a fresh complexion, hazel eyes and brown hair. He also had a small round scar on the center of his back between his shoulders and a brown birthmark on his right thigh.

He entered the Army on 26 February 1906 as a private and served until 27 June 1908 when he was granted a free discharge. During his Army service he was present at annual training in 1906, 1907, and 1908.

Gairbraid Avenue in the Maryhill area of Glasgow where Oswald Dykes
Riddell lived in 1901; photograph courtesy of Glasgow Guide
Discussion Boards

On 31 August 1906 he married Elizabeth Scott, a 19-year-old dressmaker, according to the forms of the United Free Church. During their marriage, they had four children:
  • Janet Wilson Dick, born 13 September 1906 in Maryhill, Glasgow
  • James Dick, born 10 May 1908 in Maryhill, Glasgow
  • John Scott Dick, born 3 January 1910 in Maryhill, Glasgow
  • Oswald Dick, born 26 July 1912 in Maryhill, Glasgow
Oswald's wife, Elizabeth, died of pneumonia on 11 August 1914 at their home on 71 Balfour Street in Glasgow. She was 26 years old. His son, John Scott Dick, died of tuberculosis on 6 November 1914.

Three years later, Oswald married his first cousin, Henrietta Riddell, daughter of aunt and namesake uncle, Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell. Sometime during World War I, Oswald was drafted into the British Army. He served with the 1/5 Battation of the Seaforth Highlanders. On 12 May 1915 the regiment was organized as part of the 152nd Brigade, 51st (Highland) Division.

He was killed 21 July in France and was buried at the Epernay French National Cemetery. He was later exhumed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and reburied at Terlincthun British Cemetery in Wimville, France.

_______________
Bewsher, F. W., The History of the 51st (Highland) Division, (Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1921), pages 321-355
"Gairbraid Avenue, Maryhill, Glasgow," Glasgow Guide Discussion Boards
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Barony; ED: 12; Page: 15; Line: 20; Roll: CSSCT1891_220
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Maryhill; ED: 38; Page: 14; Line: 5; Roll: CSSCT1901_241
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Dick, Oswald (Census 1911 644/14 021/00 027)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1888 Dick, Oswald Dykes Riddell (Statutory Births 622/01 0772)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1906 Dick, Oswald - Scott, Elizabeth (Statutory Marriages 622/01 0286)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1917 Dick, Oswald - Riddell, Henrietta (Statutory Marriages 644/10 0370)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1918 Dick, Oswald (Statutory Deaths 128/AF 0357
UK, Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects, 1901-1929, NAM Accession Number: 1991-02-333; Record Number Ranges: 166001-767500; Reference: 462
UK, British Military Service Records, Attestation for Militia or Reserve of the Militia, GBM_WO96_1285_203_001
UK, British Military Service Records, Description of Oswald Dick on Enlistment, GBM_WO96_1285_203_002
UK, British Military Service Records, Military History Sheet, GBM_WO96_1285_203_004
UK, British Military Service Records, Statement of the Services of No. 1485, Dick, O., GBM_WO96_1285_003
UK, Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC), 1918 Dick, O
UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, 1918 Dick, Oswald

2.3.3.4. Henrietta Riddell (1889-unknown)

Henrietta Riddell was born on 5 July 1889 at 48 Muiryfell Street in Coatbridge, Scotland. She was the fourth child of Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell. In 1891 Henrietta lived with her parents and siblings at 48 St. John Street in Old Monkland. In 1901 she was a patient at the Fever Hospital in Coatbridge, which had been erected on the site of the Old Monkland Poorhouse.

By 1911 Henrietta was back living with her parents and siblings again at 5 Academy Street in Coatbridge. She worked as a waitress in her parents restaurant.

Six years later, at the age of 27, Henrietta married her first cousin, Oswald Dykes Riddell Dick, who coincidentally was named after her father. He was a 28-year-old, widower with four children ranging in age from 11 to 5 years old and lived at 56 Balfour Street in Glasgow. The couple married on 17 Feb 1917 by declaration and in the presence of two witnesses, Hector McIntosh and Hugh McNaught. Oswald lived in Glasgow and was an oil pump man. Henrietta lived with her parents at 5 Academy Street in Coatbridge.

On 21 July 1918, Oswald Dykes Riddell Dick was killed in action in France. Henrietta received a little over 13 pounds from the British Army on 5 November 1918 and another 4 pounds on 12 February 1920. These payments were distribution of Oswald's effects and a war gratuity.

Henrietta married John Rennie on 31 December 1919. They were married at Monkland View in Airdrie according to the forms of the United Free Church of Scotland. John was a 33-year-old bachelor, who worked as a pump man at a tube works. The couple both lived in Coatbridge at the time of their marriage.

On 30 Apr 1927 the couple boarded the White Star Line's RMS Regina in Greenock, Scotland, to immigrate to Canada. They traveled on a prepaid third class ticket and arrived in in Quebec City on 7 May. Their destination was 2762 St. Catherine Street, Montreal, the home of Henrietta's mother, Annie (Cowie) Riddell. They arrived in Quebec the day before Henrietta's sister, Mary Adams (Riddell) Dalziell and her family, who traveled on the Canadian Pacific's S/S Metagama.

White Star Line's S/S Regina; postcard image courtesy of Titanic and other
White Star Ships

Accompanying John and Henrietta was an adopted son named Samuel Dunn.

In 1957 John and Henrietta (Riddell) Rennie were living at 523 Rue Ville-Marie in Montreal. That is the last information I can definitively tie to the Rennie family.

________________
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Riddell, Oswald D (Census 1891 652/02 030/00 013
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 30; Page: 13; Line: 19; Roll: CSSCT_320
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Ridden, John (Census 1901 652/02 011/00 051)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 11; Page: 51; Line: 4; Roll: CSSCT_346
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Riddell, Oswald Dykes (Census 1911 652/02 033/00 012)
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Microfilm Publications T-479 to T-520, T-4689 to T4874, T-14700 to T-14939, C-4511 to C-4542
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1957, Rennie, Henrietta
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1889 Riddell, Henrietta (Statutory Births 652/02 0704)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1917 Dick, Oswald - Riddell, Henrietta (Statutory Marriages (644/10 0370)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1920 Rennie, John - Dick, Henrietta (Statutory Marriages 651/00 0029)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, Extract of an entry from the Register of Births in Scotland (1920, Dunne, Samuel)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, 1927, Rennie, Henrietta
"White Star Line's S/S Regina," Titanic and Other White Star Ships website

Sunday, January 25, 2015

2.3.3.3.1. Robertha Riddell (1915- )

We know very little about Robertha Riddell who has been listed in various records as Robertha Riddell, Roberta Alexander, or Robertha A. Riddell Alexander.

She was always listed on the records as the daughter of Annie Riddell, who had immigrated to Montreal in 1913. Robertha was born about 1915 in the Quebec province of Canada.

On 24 May 1920 she and her mother arrived in Liverpool, England, aboard the Canadian Pacific Line's S/S Melita. Their destination was Belfast, Ireland, where Robertha's grandmother lived at 10 Parkend Street. While there Robertha probably met her aunt, Isabella Cowie Riddell, who married during the time of Robertha's visit, and her uncle, John Riddell.

Robertha and her mother returned to Canada on 24 March 1921 aboard the Allan Line's S/S Pretorian. When the 1921 Canadian census was taken, Robertha and her mother were lodging with the Campbell McAlpine family at 570 St. Catherine Street in Montreal. The census document indicated her father had been born in Scotland.

Allan Line's S/S Pretorian; image courtesy of Gjenvick-Gjonik Archives

This is the last trace I have been able to find of Robertha Riddell or Alexander.

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1921 Canada Census, Riddell, Robertha, 570 St Catherine St
Canada, Passenger Lists 1865-1935, 1921 Alexander, Roberta
UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960, 1920 Alexander, Robertha

2.3.3.3. Annie Riddell (1887-unknown)

Annie Riddell was born 16 June 1887 at Bank Street in Airdrie, Scotland. She was the third child of Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell.

In 1891 she was living with her parents at 48 St John Street in Old Monkland. She has not been found in the 1901 census and was a servant in the home of Mr. J. Jay, a furniture dealer living at 53 St Andrews Drive in Glasgow in 1911.

Two years later at the age of 25, Annie boarded the Donaldson Line's S/S Letita in Glasgow on 5 April 1913 and immigrated to Canada. She arrived on 14 April at St Johns and told Canadian immigration officials her destination was Cookshire, which is due east of Montreal south of the St Lawrence Seaway. Her intended occupation was a domestic.

Donaldson Line's S/S Letitia; image courtesy of Ahoy Web Log

About 1915 Annie had a daughter, who she named Robertha, in Quebec province.

On 10 May 1920 Annie and her daughter left Montreal aboard the Canadian Pacific Railway's S/S Melita, arriving in Liverpool on 24 May. Their destination was Annie's mother's home at 10 Parkend Street in Belfast. Annie's youngest sister, Isabella, married between July and September 1920 in Belfast. Perhaps Annie attended the wedding? She and Robertha returned to Montreal on 24 March 1921 aboard the Allan Line's S/S Pretorian. On both passenger lists, Robertha's last name was listed as Alexander.

When the 1921 Canadian census was taken, Annie and Robertha were living at 570 Saint Catherine Street in Montreal, lodging with Campbell McAlpine's family. Annie worked as a waitress at the time.

In 1923, Annie's brother, John, immigrated to Canada. On his arrival form he indicated his destination was 746 De L'epee Avenue, the address of his sister, Annie Riddell.

In 1924, Annie's mother immigrated to Canada. On her arrival form she indicated her destination was 84 Terrace View, the address of her daughter, Mrs. Lindsay. At the time Annie (Cowie) Riddell immigrated Annie Riddell was her only daughter living in Canada.

It appears Annie married a Mr. Lindsay sometime between 13 April 1923 when John arrived in Canada and 18 May 1924 when her mother arrived. No record of the marriage has been found, though.

There are several women named Annie Lindsay included in the Canadian Voter Lists but it is impossible to determine if any of them are Annie Cowie Riddell. No death record has been located.

_______________
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 30; Page: 13; Line: 18; Roll: CSSCT1891_320
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Riddell, Oswald D (Census 1891 652/02 030/00 013)
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Riddle, Annie (Census 1911 644/18 024/00 032)
1921 Canada Census, Reference Number: RG 31; Folder Number: 142; Census Place: Montreal (City), Montreal (St Lawrence-St George), Quebec; Page Number 5
Canada, Ocean Arrivals (Form 30A), 1919-1924, Library and Archives Canada; Form 30A Ocean Arrivals (Individual Manifests), 1919-1924; Rolls: T-14939 - T-15248
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Annie Riddell, 1913
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Annie Riddell, 1921
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1887 Riddell, Annie (Statutory Births 651/01/0541)
UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960, Class: BT26; Piece: 670; Item: 5
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Annie Riddell, 1913

Saturday, January 24, 2015

2.3.3.1.5.2. Mark Evan Dalzell (1952- )

Mark Evan Dalzell was born on 22 June 1952 in Canada to Robert James and Vivian (Walker) Dalzell. In 1972 Mark lived with his parents and siblings on 1741 Southmount Avenue in St. Bruno, Quebec, Canada, and worked as a mechanic.

On 11 February 1974 Mark and Phyllis Dodds  had a son they named Mark Evan Dalzell, Jr., at the Medical Center of Vermont in Burlington, Vermont. The couple married on 21 June 1975 at St. Benedict Church in North Hero, Vermont. At the time of their marriage Mark was still living with his parents at the Southmount Avenue address in St. Bruno.

Phyllis Dodds was born on 7 February 1958 at the Mary Fletcher Hospital in Burlington, Vermont, to Homer Leroy and Evelyn (O'Meally) Dodds. At the time of her marriage, she was living on 20 Cottage Grove Avenue in South Burlington, Vermont.

Mark and Phyllis divorced sometime before 1993. On 1 May 1993 Phyllis (Dodds) Dalzell married John Traviss Dale in Stowe, Vermont.

In 1996, Mark Evan Dalzell lived in Ottawa, Canada. That same year his son lived in Newark, Delaware.

_______________
Canada, Phone and Address Directories, 1995-2002, 1996 Dalzell, Mark E.
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1972 Dalzell, Mark
US, Public Records Index, Volume I, 1996 Dalzell Mark E.
US, Vermont Birth Records, 1909-2008, Archive No: PR-1228-1229
US, Vermont Birth Records, 1909-2008, Archive No: PR-1246-1247
US, Vermont Marriage Index, 1981-1984 and 1989-2001, 1993 Dale, John - Dalzell, Phyllis
US, Vermont Marriage Records, 1909-2008, Archive No: PR-1246-1247
US, Vermont Marriage Records, 1909-2008, Archive No: PR-1228-1229
US, Vermont Marriage Records, 1909-2008, Archive No: PR-02247-02248

Children of Robert James and Vivian Mary (Walker) Dalziell

The family surname changed to Dalzell after they immigrated to Canada.

2.3.3.1.5.1 Walker Dalzell (unknown- )

The only trace of Walter Dalzell is the 1972 Canada voters lists. He was living with his parents at 1741 Southmount Street in St. Bruno, Quebec, Canada and was a student.

2.3.3.1.5.2 Mark Evan Dalzell (1952- )

The lives of Mark Evan Dalzell and his wife, Phyllis Dodds, will be covered in a future post.

2.3.3.1.5.3 Bonnie Lynn Dalzell (1954- )

Bonnie Lynn Dalzell was born on 29 May 1954 in Montreal, Canada to Robert James and Vivian (Walker) Dalzell. In 1972 she was living in St. Bruno, Quebec, Canada, and was a student. On 18 August 1979 Bonnie married John F. Smith, Jr. in a religious ceremony in Shelburne, Vermont. At the time of their marriage, Bonnie lived on 1741 Southmount Street in St. Bruno.

Her husband, John, was born on 20 January 1954 in Alberta, Canada, to John F. and Jean (Stringer) Smith. At the time of their marriage, John lived in Mayo in the Yukon Territory.

_______________
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1972 Dalzell, Walker
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1972 Dalzell, Bonnie
US, Vermont Marriage Records, 1909-2008, Archive No: PR-1468-1469
US, Vermont Marriage Records, 1909-2008, Archive No: PR-1228-1229

2.3.3.1.5. Robert James Dalziell (1920 - )

Robert James Dalziell was born on 14 September 1920 at his maternal grandparents place in Coatbridge. He was the youngest child of Robert James and Mary Adams (Riddell) Dalziell. At the age of 6, he immigrated to Canada with his parents and two older brothers, joining his sisters, who had immigrated the year, at the home of his maternal grandmother.

In 1945 Robert was in the Air Force and living with his parents at 164 Hillsdale Avenue in Westmount, Quebec.

According a Dalziel (or Dalziell or Dalzell) cousin, Robert married Vivian Walker and had three children. In 1972 Robert Dalzell lived at 1741 Southmount Avenue in St. Bruno, Quebec, Canada. Living with him at that address was his wife, Vivian, three children, and his father-in-law, Roy Walker. Robert James Dalzell worked as a salesman.

________________
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Dalziel, Robert James (Census 1911 652/00 018/00 015)
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Robert James Dalziell, 1927
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1945 Dalzell, Robt.
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1972 Dalzell, Robert
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, Extract of an Entry from the Register of Births in Scotland 6510689 CE
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Robert James Dalziell, 1927

Dorothy Dalzell Obituary

Dorothy Dalzell
"Dorothy Dalzell slipped away from us on September 15 2002.

Celebrating her life, Oswald her loving husband of 54 years; daughters, Ginny and Ted, Maureen and James; grandchildren, Kristofer (Angela), Jordy, Michael (Andrea), Leah, and Jenna.

Dot was born in Yorktown, Saskatchewan, on 24 June 1921. She lived in Regina until the age of 21, when she joined the RCAF Women's Division, where she served on several bases throughout Canada, teaching physical training.

Upon her discharge in 1945, Dot went to Montreal, working in War Assets, where she met Ossie. Their married life began in Northwestern Ontario, 28 August 1948. Subsequently, two daughters were born, to Dot's great joy. Thus began her love of sewing frilly dresses, something which never diminished during her lifetime. In 1954, the odyssey continued with a move to Toronto, Ottawa and in 1968, to Winnipeg.

All Mom's life she had a great love of both sports and arts and crafts. She won her first athletic medal at age 13 in Regina, which began her life as an athlete. In the Air Force, she taught physical training and developed a love of softball, which continued upon discharge. She took great pride in playing in a women's semi-professional league. Mom continued her active badminton, curling, bowling, and finally, her great passion, golf.

During these years, Mom's life was also enriched by her love of painting and arts and crafts, but especially by a wonderful love of family, fun and laughter. She did it all!

Yesterday is already a dream.
And tomorrow is only a vision;
But today, well lived,
makes every yesterday a dream of happiness
and every tomorrow a vision of hope.

There is great joy in your release, but we miss you already.

As published in the Winnipeg Free Press on 19 September 2002.

2.3.3.1.4. Dorothy (maiden name unknown) (1921-2002)

The only information I have about Oswald Riddell Dalzell's wife, Dorothy, is from a few Canadian voters lists and her obituary. Dorothy was born on 24 June 1921 in Yorkton, Canada. Her parents names are unknown. She served in Royal Canadian Air Force Women's Division during World War II.

Dorothy married Ossie Dalzell on 28 August 1948. The couple lived in many locations in Canada, moving as Dorothy's husband job required. They had two daughters.

Dorothy died on 15 September 2002.

_______________
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1957 Dalzell, Dorothy
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1958 Dalzell, Dorothy
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1963 Dalzell, Dorothy
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1972 Dalzell, Dorothy
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1943 Dalzell, Dorothy
Winnipeg Free Press, Dorothy Dalzell, 19 Sep 2002

Friday, January 23, 2015

Oswald Riddell Dalzell Obituary

Oswald Riddell Dalzell
On January 22, 2003 at the age of 85, our "Dere Old Dad" left us to join the great love of his life, our mother, Dot.

Dad was born June 29, 1917 in Coatbridge, Scotland, where he lived until he immigrated to Montreal at the age of 10. Growing in Montreal instilled in Dad an everlasting "joie de vivie" which showed in his great love for family, friends, travel and a sense of adventure.

Dad joined the RCAF in 1940, serving overseas during wartime with the 86th Squadron as wireless air gunner, with peacetime, he returned to Montreal to work at War Assets, where he met our mom. Then came an opportunity to move to Marathon, Ontario, where he and Mom were married in 1948. Dad began his career in recreation as director for the town. This was followed by a move to Terrace Bay, Ontario. After six years and two little girls, Dad was the first Parks and Recreation Director and then Commissioner for Scarborough, Ontario, where he stayed for the next nine years. The family then continued the adventure by moving to Morrisburg, Ontario, where Dad became General Manager for the St. Lawrence Seaway Parks Commission and owned his first convertible! How he loved to drive that car, top down, heater on!

Dad then changed gears a bit, by taking a position in Ottawa with a landscape architect firm, just to be involved with Expo 67 in Montreal. It was a time to practice his French and renew his love for a great city!

Then in 1968, one more move to Winnipeg where he became Director of Operations for Manitoba Provincial Parks. He travelled the province extensively, east, west, north and south, particularly enjoying the festivals in The Pas and Flin Flon and bringing home pickerel cheeks for Mom, his #1 girl. Upon his retirement at 65, Dad found he wasn't finished yet, so became a consultant for the ARC authority in Winnipeg, which he continued until he really retired at age 70.

During Dad's lifetime, he was also involved with Kiwanis, Wartime Pilots, the Manitoba Motor League and the Hockey Hall of Fame (Manitoba), all of which gave he and Mom opportunities to travel, entertain and make new friends all over the world, with a particular love for New Zealand.

For the past four years, Dad was Mom's "caregiver extraordinaire." Nobody did it better, Dad! They shared a great life together and are united once again.

"Aren't we the lucky ones!"

 As published in the Winnipeg Free Press on 29 January 2003.

2.3.3.1.4. Oswald Riddell Dalziell (or Dalzell) (1917-2003)

Oswald Riddell Dalziell was born on 29 Jun 1917 in Coatbridge, Scotland. His parents were Robert James and Mary Adams (Dalziell). When he was 9 years old, he immigrated to Canada with his parents and brothers. They boarded the RMS Metagama in Glasgow on 28 April 1927 and arrived in Quebec City on 8 May. They traveled by train to Montreal, joining Oswald's sisters, who had immigrated the year before, at the home of their maternal grandmother at 2762 St. Catherine Street.

He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1940. Once during his service in 1944 he on a TWA plane from Stephenville, Newfoundland to La Guardia Field in New York. The plane had originated in Casablanca. At the time of the flight he was a Sergeant. Sometime before joining the military he changed the spelling of his last name to Dalzell and went by "Ossie."

He married Dorothy, maiden name unknown, and they lived at Winnipeg, Canada in 1974 at 30 University Crescent, where they appeared on the Canadian electoral rolls.

Ossie and Dorothy had two daughters. Dorothy died in 2002 and Ossie died on 22 January 2003 in Winnipeg.

_________________
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, 1927 Dalziell, Oswald
Canada, Phone an Address Directories, 1995-2002, 1996 Dalzell, O R
Canada, Phone an Address Directories, 1995-2002, 1997 Dalzell, O R
Canada, Phone an Address Directories, 1995-2002, 1998 Dalzell, O R
Canada, Phone an Address Directories, 1995-2002, 1999 Dalzell, O R
Canada, Phone an Address Directories, 1995-2002, 2000 Dalzell, O R
Canada, Phone an Address Directories, 1995-2002, 2001 Dalzell, O R
Canada, Phone an Address Directories, 1995-2002, 2002 Dalzell, O R
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1945 Dalzell, Oswald
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1957 Dalzell, Oswald
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1963 Dalzell, Oswald
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1974 Dazell, Oswald
Global, Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current, 2003 Dalzell, Ossie Riddell
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, 1927 Dalziell Oswald Riddell
US, New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957, 1944 Dalzell, Oswald
Winnipeg Free Press, Oswald Riddell Dalzell, 29 January 2003

2.3.3.1.2.1. James Nicolson Beaton (1934-2003)

James Nicolson Beaton, Jr., was born on 21 January 1934 in Montreal, Canada, to James Nicolson and Martha (Dalzell) Beaton. In 1957 he lived with his parents at 145 Millhaven Avenue and was a student.

According to a family tree of his grand nephew, he married Doris Gertrude Stott on 25 July 1958 in Valois, Canada.

In 1965 the couple lived at 5081 Bourassa Street in Montreal. James was a salesman and Doris taught ballet.

The Canadian telephone and address directories indicated James and Doris lived at 51 Tournesol Street in St Joachim de Shefford, Quebec, in 1996 and 1997. It is an on-island suburb just south of downtown Montreal.

James Nicolson Beaton died on 1 October 2003. The last residence listed for him in the Social Security death index merely says 953 (U.S. Consulate), Canada. He was issued a social security card while in the State of New York.

_______________
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1957 Beaton, James, Jr.
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1965 Beaton, James, Jr.
Canada, Phone and Address Directories, 1995-2002, 1996 1997 Beaton, James, Jr.
US, Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014, 112-92-7459 Beaton, James

Thursday, January 22, 2015

2.3.3.1.2. James Nicolson Beaton (1905-1986)

James Nicolson Beaton was born on 21 Oct 1905 at his parents home on Lyndoch Street in Greenock, Renfrewshire to Alexander Fleming and Jessie Gammie (Nicolson) Beaton.

On 22 July 1921, at the age of 15,  James boarded the Ancor Line's S/S Cassandra in Glasgow. His intention was to settle permanently in Canada. Previous to his departure he lived at 28 Milton Street in the Partick area of Glasgow. His occupation on the passenger manifest was listed as laborer.

Anchor-Donaldson Line's S/S Cassandra; image; ClydeSite

The Cassandra arrived in Quebec in late July or early August. James was joining his father, who lived at 17 Third Avenue in the Viauville area of Montreal. His father was an iron molder and James' intended occupation was to be a blacksmith's boy. His mother arrived in Canada on 11 December 1922 with the couple's two younger children.

On 12 September 1931 James married Martha Dalzell in Montreal at St. Cuthbert's Presbyterian Church. They had at least two children -- a son, also named James Nicolson Beaton on 21 January 1934 in Montreal and a daughter.

The family appeared on several Canadian voters lists throughout the years in Montreal.
  • 1940: They lived at 1653 Rue Aird; James worked as a clerk
  • 1949: They lived at 4507 St. Catherine Street, West (near Martha's parents); James worked as a clerk
  • 1957: They lived at 145 Millhaven Avenue; James worked as a chief clerk
  • 1963: They still lived at the address on Millhaven and James was a clerk
The Find A Grave record for James indicated he died in December 1983. The 16th could be his death or burial date. He is supposed to be buried in the Mont Royal Cemetery but no record exists for him on their website.

_______________
Canada, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current, FAG Memorial # 108989783
Canada, Ocean Arrivals (Form 30A), 1919-1924, Rolls: T-14939 - T-15248, 1921 Beaton, James 
Canada, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection, 1621-1967, 1931 Beaton, James - Dalzell, Martha
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1940 Beaton, James
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1949 Beaton, James
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1957 Beaton, James
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1963 Beaton, James
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, 1921 Beaton, James
Scotland, Statutory Birth Registration, 1855-2013, 1905 Beaton, James Nicolson (Statutory Births 564/01 1019)

2.3.3.1.2. Martha (Dalziell or Dalzell) (1910-unknown)

Martha Dalziell was born on 5 June 1910 at 104 Stirling Street in Airdrie, Scotland. Her parents were Robert James and Mary Adams (Riddell) Dalziell. She immigrated to Canada with her older sister in 1926 and went to live with her maternal grandmother, Annie (Cowie) Riddell at 2762 St. Catherine Street in Montreal. Her parents and brothers immigrated the next year.

Canadian Pacific Line's S/S Montnairn; image courtesy of NavSource

Martha married James Nicolson Beaton on 12 September 1931 at the St. Cuthbert's Presbyterian Church in Montreal. They had at least two children -- a son in 1934, James Nicolson Beaton, Jr. and a daughter.

The Canadian voters lists have been some help in tracing where James and Martha lived after their marriage. In 1940 they lived at 1653 Rue Aird; in 1949 at 4507 St. Catherine Street, West, in Westmount, around the corner from her parents; in 1957 they were back in the city, living at 146 Millhaven Avenue; they lived at the same address in 1963. The 1957 voter list indicated Martha was an office worker. It was the only time an occupation was listed for her.

I do not know when she died. Her husband died in December 1983.

________________
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Dalziel, Robert James (Census 1911 652/00 018/00 015)
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Martha Dalziell, 1926
Canada, Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967, Beaton, James - Dalziel, Martha
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1940 Beaton, Mrs. James
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1949 Beaton, Mrs. James
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1957 Beaton, Martha
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1963 Beaton, Martha
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1910 Dalziell, Martha (Statutory Births 651/00 0639)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Martha Dalziell, 1926

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Children of Robert James and Mary Adams (Riddell) Dalziell

The family changed the spelling of their surname in Canada to Dalzell.

2.3.3.1.1. Annie Cowie Dalziell (1908-unknown)

Annie Cowie Dalziell was born on 25 June 1908 at 31 Deedes Street in Airdrie, Scotland. Her parents were Robert James and Mary Adams (Riddell) Dalziell. In 1911 she was living with her parents and younger sister at Old Farm on Quarry Street in Coatbridge.  Sometime before 1915, the family moved to a house owned by Annie's grandfather, Oswald Dykes Riddell, at Hollandhurst and Gartsherrie in Coatbridge. When Annie was 17 years old, she and her younger sister boarded the Canadian Pacific Railway's S/S Montnairn on 18 June 1926. They arrived in Quebec City on 26 June and traveled by train to their maternal grandmother's home at 2762 St. Catherine Street in Montreal. When her parents immigrated the next year, Annie and Martha were still living at the same address.

In 1945 Annie lived with her parents at 164 Hillside Avenue in Westmount, Quebec, and worked as a hostess. She continued to live with her parents at that address at least until 1957. At that time she was a supervisor at Eaton's, a job she held through 1974. Eaton's was a retail and social institution in Canada until it went bankrupt in 1999. The 1962 voter lists indicated she and her father lived in Apartment 3 at 4508 St. Catherine Street, West, in Westmount. In 1968 Annie lived in Apartment 28 at Cote-St. Luc Road in Westmount. The last time her name appeared on the voters lists was 1974.

Eaton's in Montreal in 1941; photograph courtesy of Wikipedia

2.3.3.1.2. Martha Dalziell (1910-unknown)

The lives of Martha Dalziell and her husband, James Nicolson Beaton, will be covered in future posts.

2.3.3.1.3. John Dalziell (1913-unknown)

John Dalziel was born on 12 September 1913 at his maternal grandparents house in Coatbridge, Scotland. His parents were Robert James and Mary Adams (Riddell) Dalziell. When John was 13 years old, he, his parents and two younger brothers, boarded the Canadian Pacific Railway's S/S Metagama in Glasgow on 29 April 1927. They arrived in Quebec City on 8 May 1927 and traveled by train to the home of his maternal grandmother in Montreal, joining his two older sisters, who had immigrated the year before.

In 1945 John was in the Army and living with his parents at 164 Hillside Avenue in Westmount, Quebec. He was also living with his parents at the same address in 1949.

According a Dalziel (or Dalziell or Dalzell) cousin, Robert had a son.

2.3.3.1.4. Oswald Riddell Dalziell (1917-2003)

The lives of Oswald and his wife, Dorothy, will be covered in future posts.

2.3.3.1.5. Robert James Dalziell (1920- )

The lives of Robert James Dalziell and his wife, Vivian Mary Walker, will be covered in a future post.

________________
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Dalziel, Robert James (Census 1911 652/00 018/00 015)
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Annie Cowie Dalziell, 1926
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, John Dalziell, 1927
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Robert James Dalziell, 1927
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1945 Dalzell, Miss Anne
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1945 Dalzell, John
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1945 Dalzell, Robt.
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1949 Dalzell, Annie
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1949 Dalzell, John
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1957 Dalzell, Annie
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1962 Dalzell, Anne
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1968 Dalzell, Anne
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1974 Dalzell, Ann
"Eaton's in Montreal," Wikipedia
Scotland Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1908 Dalziell, Annie Currie (Statutory Births 651/00 0752)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1913 Dalziell, John (Statutory Births 652/02 1178)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, Extract of an Entry from the Register of Births in Scotland 6510689 CE
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Annie Cowie Dalziell, 1926
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, John Dalziell, 1927
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Robert James Dalziell, 1927

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

2.3.3.1. Robert James Dalziell (1880-after 1962)

Robert James Dalziell was born on 3 August 1880 in Drumgooland, County Down, Ireland, to John and Annie (Bell) Dalziell.

By the time Robert was 21 years old he had moved to Scotland and was working as a railway carter. He boarded with the widow Catherine Watson and her children at 5 McGhie Street in Hamilton. Six years later he married Mary Adams Riddell by declaration in Glasgow. He lived Airdrie and was an electric car motorman.

By the time the 1911 census was enumerated, Robert and Mary had two daughters and were living at Old Farm on Quarry Street in Coatbridge. Robert worked as a general carrier carter. In 1915 the family was living in Old Monkland Parish in housing owned by Robert's father-in-law, Oswald Dykes  Riddell. They were at the same address five years later. Three sons were born between 1913 and 1920.

In 1926 Robert and Mary's daughters immigrated to Canada. They went to their maternal grandmother's home at 2762 St. Catherine Street in Montreal. A year later, Robert, Mary, and their three sons also immigrated to Canada. The family boarded the Canadian Pacific Railways' RMS Metagama in Glasgow on 29 April 1927 and arrived in Quebec City on 8 May. They traveled to Montreal by train.

Canadian voter lists indicated Robert and Mary Adams (Riddell) Dalziell lived at 164 Hillside Avenue in Westmount, Quebec in 1945, 1949, and 1957. Westmount is now an affluent, on-island suburb of Montreal. Mary was not listed on the 1962 voter list with her husband; therefore, I assume she died between 1957 and 1962. In 1962 Robert and his daughter, Annie, lived in Apartment 3 at 4508 St. Catherine Street, West, in Westmount. Robert does not appear on any voter list after 1962; my assumption is he died after that date.

_________________
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Dalziel, Robert Jas (Census 1901 647/00 004/00 030)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Hamilton; ED: 4; Page: 30; Line: 24; Roll: CSSCT1901_337
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Dalziell, Robert James (Census 1911 652/02 018/00 015)
1915 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1915 Riddell, Oswald D (Valuation Rolls VR 107 / 308 / 177
1920 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1920 Riddell, Oswald D (Valuation Rolls VR 107 / 348 / 201)
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Robert Dalziell, 1927
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1945 Dalzell, Robert James
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1949 Dalzell, Robert James
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1957 Dalzell, Robert James
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1962 Dalzell, Robert James
Ireland, Civil Registrations Birth Index, 1864-1958, 1880 Dalziell, Robert James
Ireland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1620-1911, 1880 Dalziell, Robert James
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1907 Dalziell, Robert James - Riddell, Mary Adams (Statutory Marriages 644/10 0910)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Robert Dalziel, 1927

Monday, January 19, 2015

2.3.3.1. Mary Adams Riddell (1883-after 1957)

Mary Adams Riddell was born on 12 March 1883 in Airdrie, Lanarkshire, at the family home at 9 Shanks Street. Her parents were Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell. She was born two months after her parents' marriage. In 1891 she was living with her parents at 48 St. John Street in Old Monkland Parish. I have not been able to find Mary in the 1901 census when she would have been 18 years old and was likely living and working outside the home.

Mary married Robert James Dalziell on 21 August 1907 at 50 Wellington Street in Glasgow. They were married by declaration in the presence of Patrick and Jeanie Frighan. Patrick and Jeanie were married on the same day and the registration for that marriage was listed just before Mary and Robert Dalziell's marriage.

In 1911 the couple lived at Old Farm on Quarry Street in Coatbridge, which was about a mile from Mary's parents' home. At the time the census was taken Robert and Mary had two daughters. Three sons would follow after 1911.

In 1926 their two daughters, Annie and Martha, immigrated to Canada. The rest of the family immigrated to Canada a year later, embarking in Glasgow.  They sailed third class on the Canadian Pacific Railway's RMS Metagama. They landed in Quebec on 8 May 1927. They arrived in Quebec the day after Mary's sister Henrietta and her husband, John Rennie, who traveled from Scotland onboard another ship. Mary's family continued to Montreal by train. Their destination was 2762 St. Catherine Street, the home of her mother, Annie (Cowie) Riddell. I wonder if the two families traveled together?

Canadian Pacific Railway's RMS Metagama; image courtesy of
Greatships.net

Canadian voter lists indicated Robert and Mary Adams (Riddell) Dalziell lived at 164 Hillside Avenue in Westmount, Quebec in 1945, 1949, and 1957. Westmount is now an affluent, on-island suburb of Montreal. Mary was not listed on the 1962 voter list with her husband; therefore, I assume she died between 1957 and 1962. The family spelled their surname DALZELL in Canada.

____________
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Riddell, Oswald D (Census 1891 652/02 030/00 013)
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 30; Page: 13; Line: 16; Roll: CSSCT1891_320
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Dalziell, Robert James (Census 1911 652/02 018/00 015)
Canada, Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, Mary Dalziell, 1927
Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980, 1945, Dalzell Mrs. R
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1883 Riddell, Mary Adams (Statutory Births 651/01 0129)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1907 Dalziell, Robert James - Riddell, Mary Adams (Statutory Marriages 644/10 0910)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, Class: BT26; Mary Dalziell, 1927

1911-1935 Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell Timeline

When family groups starting moving to different places, I will often develop a timeline in order to keep track of where everyone in the family group was located at a particular time. I did this with Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell's family as I found the separation of Oswald and Annie quite confusing. I still don't understand it but this helped quite a bit:

1911-1935 Timeline for Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Children of Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell

2.3.3.1. Mary Adams Riddell (1883-unknown)

The lives of Mary Adams Riddell and her husband, Robert James Dalziell, will be covered in future posts.

2.3.3.2. Martha Muir Riddell (1885-unknown)

Martha Muir Riddell was born on 23 February 1885 at the family home at 43 Chapel Street in Airdrie, Lanarkshire, Scotland. She was the second child of Oswald Dykes and Annie (Cowie) Riddell.  In 1891 she lived with her parents and siblings at 48 St. John Street in Old Monkland Parish.

It is possible that in 1901 she was a servant in the home of Harold Robinson, a butcher, who lived and worked in Derby, England. The address was 58 Omaston Road. If it was our Martha Muir Riddell, she was listed on the census document as Martha M. Riddell, Servant, Single, 16 years old, House Servant, born in Scotland.

We know Martha lived with her parents and some of her siblings at 5 Academy Street, in Coatbridge and worked in her parents' restaurant as a waitress in 1911.

She disappeared from the records after that time. It is possible she died in Sussex, England. There is a tantalizing obituary which appeared in the Andrews newspaper index card, 1790-1976, which stated:

RIDDELL, MARTHA MAIR RIDDELL, otherwise MARTHA RIDDELL, spinster, late of 79, Sackville Road, Hove, Sussex, died at Lewes, Sussex, on 3rd March, 1969. (Estate about 70 pounds.)

2.3.3.3. Annie Riddell (1887-unknown)

The life of Annie Riddell will be covered in a future post.

2.3.3.4. Henrietta Riddell (1889-unknown)

The lives of Henrietta Riddell and her husbands, Oswald Dykes Riddell Dick and John Rennie, will be covered in future posts.

2.3.3.5. Janet Cowie Riddell (1891-unknown)

The lives of Janet Cowie Riddell and her husband, Arthur McDonald Smith, will be covered in future posts.

2.3.3.6. John Riddell (1893-unknown)

The lives of John Riddell and his wife, Mary Lothin Forsyth, will be covered in future posts.

2.3.3.7. Isabella Cowie Riddell (1897-1979)

The lives of Isabella Cowie Riddell and her husband, James Davidson Forman, will be covered in future posts.

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1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Riddell Oswald D (Census 1891 652/02 030/00 013)
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 30; Page: 13; Line: 17; Roll: CSSCT1891_320
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Riddell Oswald (Census 1901 652/02 027/00 014)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Aberdeen; ED: 7; Page: 20; Line: 8; Roll: CSSCT1901_84
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 27; Page 14; Line: 22; Roll: CSSCT1901_348
1901 England Census, Clas RG13; Piece: 3213; Folio: 137; Page: 29
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Riddell Oswald Dykes (Census 1911 652/02 033/00 012)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1885 Riddell, Martha Muir (Statutory Birth 651/01 0112)
UK, Andrews Newspaper Index Cards, 1790-1976, 1969 Riddell, Martha Mair

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Annie (Cowie) Riddell: Canada Ocean Arrivals Form

This is the document that started all the questions I have about Annie (Cowie) Riddell. Why was she living in Belfast? Was her husband, Oswald, living with her? Why did she immigrate to Canada without him? Was the break up of her son's marriage the reason?

Canada Ocean Arrivals form for Annie (Cowie) Riddell

Friday, January 16, 2015

2.3.3. Ann Cowie (1857-unknown)

Ann Cowie was born on 4 February 1857 in New Monkland Parish, Scotland. Her parents were William and Mary (Adams) Cowie. Her father was a coal miner. When the 1861 census was enumerated, the family was still living in New Monkland and consisted of four daughters.

By 1871 Annie was living and working in the home of John and Janet Danation as a general servant. Mr. Danation was an underground manager at a colliery in New Monkland. When the 1881 census was enumerated, Annie had moved to East Kilbride Parish and worked as a dairy maid on a farm managed by William King. Her younger sister also lived with the Kings and worked in their home as a servant.

On 26 January 1883 Annie Cowie married Oswald Dykes Riddell in Airdrie, Lanarkshire. Before her marriage she had moved back to New Monkland and was working as a domestic servant. By the time of the census in 1891 Oswald and Annie had four daughters and lived at 48 John Street in Old Monkland where Oswald worked as a coachman and domestic servant.

Ten years later the family consisted of seven living children -- six girls and one boy -- and they lived at 18 Baird Street in Old Monkland. Oswald was still a coachman.

In 1911 Oswald had changed careers and he and his wife were restaurant keepers. Several of their children worked at the restaurant with them. The family lived at 5 Academy Street in Coatbridge. Four years later, Oswald owned several pieces of property near the Hollandhurst and Gartsherrie area in Old Monkland. He is the first descendant of Robert and Henrietta (Brown) Muir to become a property owner.

Oswald and Annie's daughter, also named Annie, immigrated to Canada in 1913. She returned in 1920 for a visit. Perhaps she came back for her sister's wedding? Isabella Cowie Riddell married James Davidson Forman in 1920 in Belfast. At the time her mother was living at 10 Parkend Street in Belfast, Northern Ireland. I have no evidence that Oswald Dykes Riddell was living with his wife. Their son John also lived at the Parkend Street address in 1923.

On 10 May 1924 Annie (Cowie) Riddell boarded the White Star Line's RMS Regina in Belfast and sailed for Canada. She was in the linen business and lived at 30 Raby Street at the time of her immigration. She traded with Nell Carnduff or White, 23, and her 3-year-old grandson, David Forsyth Riddell. She arrived in Quebec on 18 May and indicated to Canadian authorities she was married and intended to settle permanently in Canada. Her stated destination was the home of her daughter, a Mrs. Lindsay, who lived at 84 Terrace View in Montreal. It is possible that daughter, Annie, had married by this time. She is the only child known to be in Canada.

White Star Line's RMS Regina; image courtesy of Titantic and Other
White Star Line Ships

In 1927 Oswald and Annie's oldest daughter, husband and children immigrated to Canada and joined their mother. And in 1928 her daughter Henrietta and her family joined other family members at Annie (Cowie) Riddell's house on 2762 St. Catherine Street in Montreal. Son John and immigrated in 1923, the year before his mother.

Of Oswald and Annie's seven children, five immigrated to Canada, one remained in Scotland, and one disappeared from the records after 1911. Oswald's death registration indicated he was a widower when he died in 1935. No death date has been located for his wife. And the mystery of their marriage remains. What happened to it?

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1861 Scotland Census, 07/04/1861 Cowie, Annie (Census 1861 651/02 005/00 011)
1861 Scotland Census, Parish: New Monkland; ED: 5; Page: 11; Line: 16; Roll: CSSCT1861_117
1871 Scotland Census, 02/04/1871 Cowie, Annie (Census 1871 651/02 005/00 009)
1881 Scotland Census, 03/04/1881 Cowie, Annie (Census 1881 643/00 009/00 008)
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Riddell, Oswald D (Census 1891 652/02 030/03 013)
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 30; Page: 13; Line: 15; Roll: CSSCT1891_320
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Riddell, Oswald (Census 1901 652/02 027/00 014)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 27; Page 14; Line: 20; Roll: CSSCT1901_348
1911 Scotland Census, 02/04/1911 Riddell, Oswald Dykes (Census 1911 652/02 033/00 012)
Canada, Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935, 1924, Cowie, Annie
Canada, Ocean Arrivals (Form 30A), 1919-10924, Rolls: T-14939 - T-15248, 1924 Riddell, Annie
Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950, Annie Cowie, 1857
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1857 Cowie, Ann (Statutory Births 651/02 0056)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1883 Riddell, Oswald D - Cowie, Annie (Statutory Marriages 651/01 0025)
UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960, 1924 Cowie, Annie, 140596

Thursday, January 15, 2015

2.3.3. Oswald Dykes Riddell (1859-1935)

Oswald Dykes Riddell was born on 5 April 1859 in the village of Kirkton, East Kilbride. His parents were John and Martha (Muir) Riddell. When his father registered his birth on 16 April, the infant was registered as Robert Riddell.  There is a notation dated 15 May 1859 that stated his name was altered to Oswald Dykes Riddell.  According to the Scottish naming conventions, which John and Henrietta followed with their first two children, Robert should have been his name after his maternal grandfather, who was still alive at the time of his birth.

James Oswald Dykes, born in 1835, was a contemporary of John and Martha (Muir) Riddell. He became a Scottish Presbyterian clergyman and educator and was ordained the year Oswald Dykes Riddell was born. So likely had not yet made a name for himself at the time of Oswald's birth. Therefore, the name change is a tantalizing mystery.

The family moved to Main Street in the village of East Kilbride by the time Oswald was two. I have not been able to find him in 1871 census. His older sister, Henrietta, was also away from the home working as a live-in domestic servant in Glasgow. In 1881 Oswald was one of two servants living and working at David Aitkenhead's dairy farm in Murray, East Kilbride.

Two years later he married Ann Cowie, who went by "Annie." They were married on 26 January 1883 in Airdrie Burgh. They were married according to the forms of the Church of Scotland. Oswald was working as a railway lorry man and lived in New Monkland Parish. Annie was a domestic servant, who lived in Dryflat, New Monkland.

The couple had seven children between 1883 and 1897. In 1891 Oswald and Annie and their four girls, Mary, Martha, Annie, and Henrietta, were living 48 St John Street in Coatbridge. Oswald worked as a coachman. Four years later they lived at 151 A Main Street in Coatbridge. Oswald was working at the same profession.

In 1895 the valuation rolls indicated the family was living at the same address, which was owned by Merry Stowe House. Oswald paid 13 pounds in annual rent, due each Whitsun. When the 1901 census was enumerated, Oswald and Annie lived at 18 Baird Street in Coatbridge with their two youngest daughters, Janet and Isabella.

Baird Street in Coatbridge in the early 1900s; photograph courtesy of
Monklands Memories

There is no record of Oswald in the 1905 valuation rolls, but in 1911 he, Annie, and four of their seven children lived at 5 Academy Street in Coatbridge. Oswald had a pretty big career change within the last ten years and was a restauranteur. His three older children working in the family restaurant.

In 1913 Oswald's, third daughter, Annie, immigrated to Canada at the age of 25. In 1915 Oswald was renting a house and shop on Academy Street from Fergie and Elizabeth Wortherspoon. The annual rent was 50 pounds. He was recorded in the rolls as a landowner for the first time as the proprietor of 9 houses, sheds and ground at Hollandhurst and Gartsherrie in Coatbridge. He rented 8 of the houses for between 6 and 9 pounds each annually.

Academy Street in Coatbridge; photograph copyrighted by the Scottish
Mining Website

In 1920 he owned the same property but his occupation was laborer. I do know know what happened to the restaurant. The next year his daughter, Annie, returned from Canada to visit her mother, who was living in Belfast, Ireland, at the time of Annie's visit.

Son, John Riddell, immigrated to Canada in 1923. In 1924 Oswald's wife, followed her son to Canada. She indicated she was married but was traveling alone and intended to settle permanently in Canada. Daughter, Mary Adams (Riddell) Dalziell, and her family moved to Canada in 1927; Daughter, Henrietta (Riddell) Rennie, and her family also moved there the same year. There is no record that Oswald ever joined the majority of his family in Canada.

He died on 11 February 1935 at his home on 14 Bellsdyke Road in Airdrie at the age of 75. The cause of death was chronic bronchitis and heart failure. Arthur Smith, husband of Oswald's daughter, Janet, registered his death. He indicated Oswald was a widower, which would indicate Annie had died and he was a retired restauranteur.

I have so many questions about Oswald Dykes Riddell. Where was he in 1871? Why was he not living at home with his parents? It is unusual to lose a 12-year-old boy in the census. How did Oswald get enough money to buy so much property? Why did his wife move to Belfast and then to Canada? What was the true state of their marriage?

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1861 Scotland Census, 07/04/1861 Riddell, John (Census 1861 643/00 001/00 017)
1861 Scotland Census, Parish: East Kilbride; ED: 1; Page: 18; Line: 3; Roll: CSSCT1861_95
1881 Scotland Census, 03/04/1881 Riddell, Oswald D (Census 1881 643/00 011/00 002)
1881 Scotland Census, Parish: East Kilbride; ED: 11; Page: 2; Line: 2; Roll: CSSCT1881_213
1891 Scotland Census, 05/04/1891 Riddell, Oswald D (census 1891 652/02 030/00 013)
1891 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 30; Page: 13; Line: 14; Roll: CSSCT1891_320
1895 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1895 Riddell, Oswald Dykes (Valuation Rolls VR14 / 8 / 334)
1901 Scotland Census, 31/03/1901 Riddell, Oswald (Census 1901 652/02 027/00 014)
1901 Scotland Census, Parish: Old Monkland; ED: 27; Page: 14; Line: 19; Roll: CSSCT1901_348
1911 Scotland Census 02/04/1911 Riddell, Oswald Dykes (Census 1911 652/02 033/00 012)
1915 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1915 Riddell, Oswald D (Valuation Rolls VR107 / 308 / 177)
1915 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1915 Riddell, Oswald D (Valuation Rolls VR14 / 24 / 470)
1920 Scotland Valuation Rolls, 1920 Riddell, Oswald D (Valuation Rolls VR107 / 348 / 201)
Academy Street in Coatbridge, Scottish Mining Website
Baird Street in Coatbridge, Monklands Memories
Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950, Janet Cowie Riddell, 1891
Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950, Robert Riddell, 1859
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1859 Riddel, Oswald Dykes (Statutory Births 643/00 0037)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1883 Riddell, Oswald D - Cowie, Annie (Statutory Marriages 651/01 0025)
Scotland, Statutory Registrations, 1855-2013, 1935 Riddell, Oswald Dykes (Statutory Deaths 651/00 0039)

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Children of John and Henrietta (Findlay) Turner

There were six children with the Turner surname born in Kilfinan, Argyll between 1927 and 1936:
  • Henrietta Turner (born 1927)
  • Alexander Campbell Turner (1928-1990; married Catherine Petterson)
  • John Mitchell Turner (born 1931)
  • John Turner (born 1931)
  • Alistar Findlay Turner (born 1933)
  • Ann Ysobel Turner (born 1936; married Robert William Blain)
However, I do not know which ones were children of John and Henrietta (Findlay) Turner and which ones were children of John's brother.

If anyone knows more, I would love to hear from you.